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Hello,
I'm a French student, and I have to make an english summary (oral). I chose the theme "Formula One".
Can you help me by listing and eventually correcting my mistakes please ?

Thanks Emotion: smile

The summary :

I. History and presentation

Formula One was created in 1920s, but the first drivers’ world championship race was in 1950, in Silverstone. The constructors’ championship has been created in 1958.

Since 1950 there have been 29 different world champions. The most titled is Michael Schumacher, who is 7 times world champion.

Formula One is regulated by an association called FIA (Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile) which was created in Paris in 1904.

Its role in Formula One is to make the rules and to make sure they are applied.

Another association has an important role in F1, the FOA (Formula One Administration), actually directed by Bernie Ecclestone. This association has all Formula One commercial rights. The FOA decides which circuits will be integrated to the championship, and it also controls the media distribution and TV transmission. FOA currently receives 23% of TV revenues, teams 47% and FIA 30%.

2008’s teams ordered by 2007 results are : were Ferrari (the only constructor in Formula One since 1950), BMW, Renault, Williams powered by Toyota, Red Bull powered by Renault, Toyota, Toro Rosso powered by Ferrari, Honda, Super Aguri powered by Honda, Force India powered by Ferrari and McLaren powered by Mercedes.

11 teams, so 22 drivers.

Super Aguri abandonned before the fifth Grand Prix, because of financial problems.

II. Races procedure and rules

Actually there are about 18 races per championship.

A race week-end starts on Friday morning with the first free practice. From 10 o’clock to 11:30. A second free practice starts at 14 o’clock until 15:30.

Those free practices are used to set up the cars.

Then, on Saturday from 11 o’clock to midday there is the last free practice.

Qualifying starts at 14 o’clock and is divided in 3 parts :

- during the first part, called Q1, all drivers try to set the fastest lap they can during 20 minutes. At the end of Q1 the first 15 drivers are qualifying for Q2. Others will start the race at the position they currently have.
Fuel quantity is free during Q1, so teams generally put fuel into cars for only 4 – 5 laps.

- Q2 is similar to Q1, but the slowest 5 drivers are eliminated.
Drivers have 15 minutes to qualify.

Fuel quantity is free, as during Q1.

- At the beginning of Q3 teams have to put fuel for the race. So some cars are lighter than others because of strategies chosen by teams.
10 minutes.

After qualifying cars go into the parc fermé until the race, and technical controls are done. Q3 drivers can’t change their fuel quantity, unlike Q1 and Q2 drivers who can choose their strategy until the race day, because they ran Q1 and Q2 without enough fuel for the race.

On Sunday, teams can take their cars back to their garages, but are not allowed to modify them. A steward is affected to each car to make sure teams respect the rules.

Starting procedure :

15 minutes before the race start, the 5 lights are red, and the pitlane is closed (so drivers who are not placed on the grid must start the race from the pits).

At less 10 minutes the first light lights out.
At less 5 minutes the second light lights out.

At less 3 minutes the third light lights out. At this time, tyres must be attached to the car. If not, the driver can have a penalty during the race.

At less 1 minute, engines must be running.

At less 30 secondes, all team personnel must have left the grid.

When all the 5 red lights are out, green lights are illuminated. Drivers can start the formation lap. During this lap it is forbidden to overtake, and drivers try to warm up their tyres.

At the end of this lap, cars come back to the grid on their respective qualifying positions.

When all cars are in position, the race procedure can begin. Each second a red light is illuminated, and when they are all illuminated a steward can start the race by extinguishing all red lights.

If, for some reasons, the starting procedure must be interrupted, all the 5 red lights and 2 orange lights blinking are illuminated.

In each race the first 8 drivers win points. The winner receives 10 pts, the second 8 pts, the third 6 pts, the fourth 5 pts, etc., and the eight 1 pt.

Constructors also win points. It’s calculated by adding his 2 drivers’ points.

Race marshalls use flags to communicate with drivers. They probably will be replaced by lights in drivers’ cokpits and on track borders because of the danger the stewards are exposed (several race marshalls were killed by tyres or debris after collisions).

Flags :

Danger flags

The most important is the yellow flag :

- a single yellow flag indicates a danger such as debris on the track. Drivers have to slow down and not to overtake.

- two waved yellow flags indicate a big danger. Drivers must prepare to stop if necessary and not to overtake.

- a yellow flag combined with a SC board indicates that the safety car has been entered onto the track.

The green flag is used after a yellow flag to indicate the track is clear.

The red flag significates that the race must be stopped, for exemple when it is a very big accident. The race director is the only person who can order to use this flag.

The blue flag is shown to a lapped driver to indicate that a faster car will overtake him. So he has to let him pass.

The yellow-red flag indicates that there will be oil or water on the track. This flag is followed by a green flag.

The white flag is a kind of specific yellow flag. It indicates there is a slow car ahead.

Penalty flags (all shown with a car number)

The black and white flag tells a driver he has had an anti-sportsman behaviour.

The black flag indicates that the driver must stop his race at the pits within 1 lap.

The black flag with an orange disc indicates there is a problem on the car. The driver must return to pits immediately. Once the problem is solved, he can go back to the race.

The chequered flag indicates the end of the race.

Comments  
Hello Anon: I have made a few suggestions to your text.
It would be good to define "grid", too.
AnonymousI. History and presentation

Formula One was created in 1920s, but the first drivers’ world championship race was in 1950, in Silverstone. The constructors’ championship was has been created in 1958. (simple past, since the action is completed)

Since 1950 there have been 29 different world champions. The most titled champion is Michael Schumacher, who is won 7 times world champion.



Formula One is regulated by an association called FIA (Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile) which was created in Paris in 1904.

Its role in Formula One is to make the rules and to make sure they are applied (obeyed or enforced are better).

Another association has an important role in F1, the FOA (Formula One Administration), actually ( presently?) directed by Bernie Ecclestone. This association has all the Formula One commercial rights. The FOA decides which circuits will be integrated into the championship, and it also controls the media distribution and TV transmission (broadcasts is better, since transmission is just a signal, boradcast is the show). FOA currently receives 23% of the TV revenues, teams receive 47% and the FIA 30%.

The 2008’s teams, ordered by 2007 results, are : were Ferrari (the only constructor that has been in Formula One since 1950), BMW, Renault, Williams (powered by Toyota), Red Bull (powered by Renault), Toyota, Toro Rosso (powered by Ferrari), Honda, Super Aguri (powered by Honda), Force India (powered by Ferrari) and McLaren (powered by Mercedes).

There are 11 teams, so there are 22 drivers.

Super Aguri abandonned the circuit before the fifth Grand Prix, because of financial problems.

II. Races procedure and rules

Actually there are about 18 races per championship.

A race week-end weekend starts on Friday morning with the first free practice, held between. From 10 o’clock and 11:30. A second free practice starts at 14 o’clock and finishes at until 15:30.

The ose free practices on Friday are used to set up the cars.

Then, on Saturday from 11 o’clock to midday, there is the last free practice.

Qualifying starts at 14 o’clock and is divided into 3 parts :

- during the first part, called Q1, all drivers try to set the fastest lap they can during 20 minutes. At the end of Q1, the first 15 drivers have qualified are qualifying for Q2. The others will start the race at the positions they currently have.

Fuel quantity is free unrestricted during Q1, so teams generally put enough fuel into cars for only 4 – 5 laps.

- Q2 is similar to Q1, but the slowest 5 drivers are eliminated.

Drivers have 15 minutes to qualify.

Fuel quantity is free unrestricted, as during Q1.

- At the beginning of Q3, teams have to put fuel up for the race. So some cars are will be lighter than others because of strategies chosen by teams.

10 minutes.

After the qualifying runs, the cars go into the parc fermé until the race, and technical controls are done. The drivers who qualified during Q3 drivers can’t change their fuel quantity, unlike Q1 and Q2 the other drivers who can choose their strategy on until the race day, because they ran Q1 and Q2 without enough fuel for the race.

On Sunday, teams can take their cars back to their garages, but are not allowed to modify them. A steward is assigned affected to each car to make sure teams respect the rules.

Starting procedure :

15 minutes before the race starts, the 5 lights are lit red, and the pitlane is closed (so drivers who are not placed on the grid must start the race from the pits).

At less 10 minutes before the race starts, the first red light lights is turned off out.
At less 5 minutes before the race starts, the second red light lights is turned off out.

At less 3 minutes before the race starts, the third light is turned off lights out. At this time, tyres must be attached to mounted on the car. If not, the driver can be penalized have a penalty during the race.

At less 1 minute before the race starts, engines must be running.

At less 30 secondes before the race starts, all team personnel must have left the grid.

When all the 5 red lights are out, green lights are illuminated. Drivers can start the formation lap. During this lap it is forbidden to overtake, and drivers try to warm up their tyres.

At the end of this lap, cars come back to the grid on their respective qualifying positions.

When all cars are in position, the race procedure can begin. Each (Every is better) second a red light is illuminated, and when they are all illuminated a steward can start the race by extinguishing all the red lights.

If, for some reasons, the starting procedure must be interrupted, all the 5 red lights and 2 orange lights blinking are illuminated.

In each race, the first 8 drivers win points. The winner receives 10 pts, the second 8 pts, the third 6 pts, the fourth 5 pts, etc., and the eight 1 pt.

Constructors also win points. It’s calculated by adding its his 2 drivers’ points.

Race marshals marshalls use flags to communicate with the drivers. They flags ("they" seems to refer to the marshals, I think you mean the flags) probably will be replaced by lights in drivers’ cockpits and on track borders because of the danger the stewards are exposed to (several race marshals marshalls were have been killed by tyres or debris after collisions).

Flags :

Danger flags



The most important is the yellow flag :

- a single yellow flag indicates a danger such as debris on the track. Drivers have to slow down and not to overtake.

- two waved (?waving) yellow flags indicate a big danger. Drivers must be prepared to stop if necessary and not to overtake.

- a yellow flag combined with a SC board indicates that the safety car has been entered onto the track.



The green flag is used after a yellow flag to indicate the track is clear.



The red flag significates that the race must be stopped, for example exemple when it is a there has been a very big accident. The race director is the only person who can order to use this flag to be used.



The blue flag is shown to a lapped driver to indicate that a faster car will overtake him. So he has to let him pass.



The yellow-red flag indicates that there will beis oil or water on the track. This flag is followed by a green flag.



The white flag is a kind of specific yellow flag. It indicates there is a slow car ahead.

Penalty flags (all shown with a car number)



The black and white flag tells a driver he has displayed had an anti-sportsman unsportsmanlike behaviour.



The black flag indicates that the driver must drop out of the race stop his race at the pits within 1 lap.



The black flag with an orange disc indicates there is a problem with on the car. The driver must return to pits immediately. Once the problem is solved, he can go back to the race.



The chequered flag indicates the end of the race.



Thank you very much Emotion: wink
I will probably post another time because I am writing the continuation
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Hello

Here is the continuation :

III. Drivers

Most of Formula One drivers come from karting, because it is considered as a great category for learning driving and to develop skills.

For example Michael Schumacher, Jenson Button, Lewis Hamilton, Felipe Massa, Kimi Raikkonen, Fernando Alonso, etc. started in karting.

Another category has become very important : GP2 series. Created in 2005, it has replaced the Formula 3000 championship. Cars are quite similar to Formula Ones : they have V8 motors, a six gears gearbox, and a speed apex of 320 km/h. Three F1 drivers come from GP2 : Lewis Hamilton, Nico Rosberg and Timo Glock.

According to Michael Schumacher in an interview, a formula 1 could go beyond 500 km/h on a track without any corner. In a race the average speed is about 250 km/h, because engineers adapt the car for it to perform in corners.

Many people think that driving a Formula One is as easy as driving their car. But race drivers have to endure G forces. When they brake they can endure up to 5.5 g. Indeed, a Formula 1 can brake from 200 km/h to a complete stop using only 65 meters.

The acceleration is very fast too (from 0 to 100 km/h in 1.7 seconds), and G Forces are about 1.5G.
In a corner at 210km/h drivers endure 3G.
So when a driver accelerates, brakes or is in a corner, he endures G Forces, that’s why physical training is very important.
Can someone correct my last part please ?
AnonymousHello

III. Drivers

Most of Formula One drivers come from karting, because it is considered as a great category for learning driving and to develop skills.

For example, Michael Schumacher, Jenson Button, Lewis Hamilton, Felipe Massa, Kimi Raikkonen, and Fernando Alonso, etc. (personal preference is to avoid "etc. - you have enough examples in the list) started in karting.

Another category has become very important : GP2 series. Created in 2005, it has replaced the Formula 3000 championship. Cars are quite similar to Formula Ones : they have V8 motors, a six gears' gearbox, and a speed apex (maximum speed?) of 320 km/h. Three F1 drivers come from the GP2 circuit : Lewis Hamilton, Nico Rosberg and Timo Glock.

According to Michael Schumacher in an interview, a Formula One 1 could exceed speeds of go beyond 500 km/h on a straight track without any corner. In a race, the average speed is about (?limited to ) 250 km/h, because engineers have to adapt the car so it will for it to perform well on in corners.

Many people think that driving a Formula One is as easy as driving their own car. But race drivers have to endure G forces. When they brake, they can endure up to 5.5 g. Indeed, a Formula 1 can brake from 200 km/h to a complete stop in a space of using only 65 meters.

Their acceleration is very fast too (from 0 to 100 km/h in 1.7 seconds), and G Forces are about 1.5G.
In a corner at 210km/h drivers endure 3G.
So when a driver accelerates, brakes or is in takes a corner, he endures G Forces, that’s why physical training is very important.

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