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When you find time , will you please do that work for me?

When you find time, can you please do that work for me?

what is the difference in writting 'will' and 'can' ?? what does that express?

pls explain..
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simple explanation

can - abilty/possibility

will - request/favor

i would suggest to use could instead of can and would instead of will

would you pls do that work for me?

could you please do that work for me?

it means you are asking a favor..
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Comments  
"When you find time, will you please do that for me?" The word "will" means "are you going to" in this sentence. Thus, "When you find time, are you going to please do that for me?" "Will" expresses that something will take place in the future.

"When you find time, can you please do that for me?" The word "can" means" "are you able to" in this sentence. Thus, "When you find time, are you able to please do that for me?" "Can" expresses ability to.
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Which of the above 2 sentences sounds as a request... [will or can]

when should we exactly use 'will' and 'can' in a sentences?
 mudclay's reply was promoted to an answer.
"When you find time, will you please do that for me?" The word "will" means "are you going to" in this sentence. Thus, "When you find time, are you going to please do that for me?" -- This is misinformation, hmea1. 'Going to' is a future plan. 'Will' is a statement of future fact-- in this case a request for the future. They are quite different in this sentence.
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dec09When you find time, will you please do that work for me?
When you find time, can you please do that work for me?
Four different words are commonly placed in the blank area of the request below.

____ you please (do that work ...)?

They are will, can, would, and could, listed -- more or less -- in order of politeness, least polite first and most polite last. Alternately, you can think of the ordering in terms of commanding, with the most commanding form first and the least commanding form last. Note that the more commanding the expression, the less polite, and conversely. (Opinions may differ regarding the rankings I'm giving here, but I give some reasons for my choices below.)

will questions the listener's willingness to do the work, most likely assuming his ability.
can questions the listener's ability to do the work, most likely assuming his willingness.
would is a more indirect and weaker way of asking will.
could is a more indirect and weaker way of asking can.

When we question someone's willingness to do something for us, we are asking a question which must be answered "Yes" unless the listener is to make himself look unwilling to help us.

When we question someone's ability to do something for us, we are asking a question which must be answered "Yes" unless the listener is to make himself look unable to help us.

The listener is placed in a more awkward position, socially, when asked a question that may show him unwilling to help than when asked a question that may show him unable to help. Therefore, the form with will exposes the listener to admitting the greater fault, because unwillingness can be attributed only to our own personal attitudes and desires, whereas inability may be more easily excused as no fault of our own, through lack of education or training.

So, supposing you want some practical advice at this point, if you are in a position to ask a favor of, say, an unruly employee whose work you direct, use will. If you are the employee asking a favor of your boss, use could. can and wouldare probably most used between social equals -- or we might expect this, at any rate, if my reasoning is correct! Emotion: smile

CJ
if i'm not mistaken if we are requesting or asking favors we normally use the past form (can/will) because they can be used for request or asking favors
mudclaywe normally use the past form (can/will)
No. can and will are not past forms, if that's what you meant to say by placing them in parentheses here.

CJ
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CalifJim
mudclaywe normally use the past form (can/will)
No. can and will are not past forms, if that's what you meant to say by placing them in parentheses here.CJ

Sorry! It's my mistake. What i mean was (could/would). Thank you!
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