+0

I wish to convey the idea that I was sick with depressive thoughts but now I have become immune to it, it longer makes me sick. So, can I write it like

I'm convalesecent of depressive thoughts.

Or will it be better to say

I have become convalescent of depressive thoughts.

?

+1
HallI wish to convey the idea that I was sick with depressive thoughts, but now (that) I have become immune to it, it no longer makes me sick.

As shown.

Hall

So [no comma] can I write it like

I'm convalesecent convalescent of depressive thoughts.

No.

Hall

Or will it be better to say

I have become convalescent of depressive thoughts.

No.

'convalescent' is just not the right word for the situation.

CJ

Comments  
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

So [no comma] can I write it like

Can you please explain why [no comma]? We were taught (if I remember coreectly it was sixth grade) that we always got to put a comma after “So” and “Thus”.


Can I say “I have become convalescent of tuberculosis”?

HallCan you please explain why [no comma]?

'so' is classified as a coordinating conjunction. It is treated the same as 'and', 'or', 'but', and other such conjunctions.

'thus' is classified as an adverbial conjunction, treated like 'however' or 'nevertheless', so it does take a comma.

(I was told a lot of things when I was in sixth grade that didn't turn out to be as accurate as I thought. Emotion: wink )

HallCan I say “I have become convalescent of tuberculosis”?

No. Say, "I am convalescing from tuberculosis" or "I have been cured of tuberculosis".

'to convalesce' is to be in recovery from an illness.

'convalescent' is usually used to describe a facility where very old people live, often people in poor health: 'a convalescent home', 'a convalescent hospital'. Each person who lives there is called 'a convalescent'.

Examples:

She went to work as a cook at a convalescent home.
He has had several surgeries and is on convalescent leave from the army.
That charitable institution gives nursing care to ill or injured convalescents.

CJ

Thank you.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.