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Hello, everyone

My grammar book says we can say "He does not work so hard as she." But I wonder if we can say in a diffrent way, just like sentence below:

He does not work harder than she.

He worked less hard than she.

Could you please tell me if I can say in this way? Is the meaning changed? Thank you for your help!Emotion: smile
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Comments  
Pls do not use red. It is used to indicate corrections/errors.
OK, I've changed it to blue, thanks.
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Hi Viceidol,

I wouldn't even say it the way your grammar book has it. I would say He does not work as hard as she does.

If you say "He does not work harder" then you are saying they could work equally hard, but your first sentence says that she works harder.

Your third one does not read naturally.
>I wouldn't even say it the way your grammar book has it. I would say He does not work as hard as she does.

GG's much more naturalEmotion: smile
Marius Hancu>I wouldn't even say it the way your grammar book has it. I would say He does not work as hard as she does.

GG's much more natural[:)


It just goes to show that the book (depedning on the writer) is not always the best answer. "Less hard" sounds stiff to me!

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ViceidolMy grammar book says we can say "He does not work so hard as she."Emotion: smile
Hi...
...what a good grammar book you have! I mean, it could be good for barbecues, hihihi. Emotion: wink

Say it these ways:
...as hard as she does.
...as hard as her.

"She" is not good on its own. Emotion: smile
But keep in mind that many grammar books advise so instead of as in the first item of comparisons when the verb is negated!

works as hard as

but

doesn't work so hard as

CJ
CJ, is that standard BrE? It sounds "old fashioned" to my American ears. I know, Califiornia is still part of the US, but you're more global than I am.
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