Someone is trying to tell me that Canadian High School diplomas mark split infinitives and prepositions at the end as incorrect and insist of such constructions as "It is I". The second seems plausible, but split infinitives and preps at the end?
Can anyone confirm this?
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Someone is trying to tell me that Canadian High School diplomas mark split infinitives and prepositions at the end as ... as "It is I". The second seems plausible, but split infinitives and preps at the end? Can anyone confirm this?

Nah, I'm no help. But I'm curious about your use of "diploma." To me, a diploma is a piece of paper showing a person has attained an academic degree. What does it mean to you?

SML
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Nah, I'm no help. But I'm curious about your use of "diploma." To me, a diploma is a piece of paper showing a person has attained an academic degree. What does it mean to you?

'High School Diploma' is used commonly here. In fact, I don't know of another noun to replace it. "High School Graduation Certificate". Would never be used. (I'm in Georgia for what it's worth).

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(snip)

Nah, I'm no help. But I'm curious about your use ... attained an academic degree. What does it mean to you?

'High School Diploma' is used commonly here. In fact, I don't know of another noun to replace it. "High School Graduation Certificate". Would never be used. (I'm in Georgia for what it's worth).

OK, I suppose high school diplomas aren't academic degrees, so I should've written a longer definition. But does the original question make sense to you?

SML
Sara Lorimer typed thusly:
(snip) 'High School Diploma' is used commonly here. In fact, ... never be used. (I'm in Georgia for what it's worth).

OK, I suppose high school diplomas aren't academic degrees, so I should've written a longer definition. But does the original question make sense to you?

I read it as something like:
The English exams taken as part of the Canadian High School graduation diploma mark split infinitives and sentences which end with a preposition as wrong.

David
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Sara Lorimer typed thusly:

OK, I suppose high school diplomas aren't academic degrees, so I should've written a longer definition. But does the original question make sense to you?

I read it as something like: The English exams taken as part of the Canadian High School graduation diploma mark split infinitives and sentences which end with a preposition as wrong.

Agreed. It doesn't sound right to me, though not wrong, just not right and I'm curious if it does to other people. Come to think of it, I wouldn't say "graduation diploma" either...

SML
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Sara Lorimer typed thusly:
Sara Lorimer typed thusly: I read it as something like: ... infinitives and sentences which end with a preposition as wrong.

Agreed. It doesn't sound right to me, though not wrong, just not right and I'm curious if it does to other people. Come to think of it, I wouldn't say "graduation diploma" either...

It's completely wrong for UK ears, but I switched to North American for this thread. "diploma" and "graduation" mean different things over here.

David
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replace usenet with the
I read it as something like: The English exams taken ... infinitives and sentences which end with a preposition as wrong.

Agreed. It doesn't sound right to me, though not wrong, just not right and I'm curious if it does to other people. Come to think of it, I wouldn't say "graduation diploma" either...

It doesn't sound right to me. The exams aren't part of the diploma, they are what you pass in order to get the diploma. More usually, they represent part of the requirements for the diploma, with the teachers' evaluations making up the rest. And since K-12 education is a provincial responsibility, there aren't really 'Canadian' examinations leading to a high school diploma. Several provinces do insist that students write provincial examinations before graduating from high school. I suppose the original questioner could check on the provincial government websites of the various provinces that run provincial examinations to find out what exactly the criteria are for passing the English examinations.

Cheryl
Someone is trying to tell me that Canadian High School ... infinitives and preps at the end? Can anyone confirm this?

Nah, I'm no help. But I'm curious about your use of "diploma." To me, a diploma is a piece of paper showing a person has attained an academic degree.

To me, too.
The thought seems to be that to pass an examination that is given as part of the process of obtaining a Canadian high-school diploma you must honor the rules against splitting an "infinitive", ending clauses with prepositions, and using pronouns with the wrong case. Evidently the word "diploma" in SD's remark must refer ultimately to the people who execute the process of granting diplomas.
Who marks things as incorrect? Not the diploma, not the process of fulfilling the requirements for a diploma, and not even the people who define that process, but the people who grade an examination that is part of that process.

Do Canadians really use "diploma" that way, or was SD using a nonce figurative meaning to save effort?
What does it mean to you?

I would ask a modified version of that question: "Is the way you're evidently using 'diploma' recognized by Canadians in general, or are you saving words by using 'diploma' very loosely under the assumption that people will know what you mean?"
Anyway, if Canadian authorities really do make graduation aspirants honor those rules, that's too bad for Canadian students. Some of them may not learn for a long time that they have been mistaught.
Some long-ago teacher taught me that to be sick means to vomit, and that it's wrong to use "sick" to mean merely "ill". That misconception stayed with me for many years. Even today, when I see "sick" used to mean the same as "ill", I feel a momentary sense that the speaker or writer has misspoken.
Hmmm ... I think I'll try to forget what I just read in Merriam-Webster's 11th Collegiate Dictionary , that "ill" can be a synonym of "nauseated".
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