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Hey, Canadians, what's your take on this?


The progressive, stative verbs, and change in Canadian English


Growing use of progressive forms with stative verbs, bolded in (1), where previously only simple

tenses Emotion: storm, underlined in (1), were allowed, is an oft-cited example of change in contemporary

English (Aitchison 1991; Jespersen 1933; Potter 1975, among others). This putative

encroachment of the progressive on the domain of ST should presumably result in the

restructuring of the stative paradigm, with the progressive either taking over some of ST’s

functions or developing new ones of its own.

(1) I know what I’m thinking and they’re all thinking the same thing. (QEC/QC/021/163)

http://www.ling.ohio-state.edu/NWAV/Abstracts/Papr179.pdf
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Comments  
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I know what I'm thinking and they're all thinking the same thing.

I see nothing remarkable about this sentence. Maybe if they gave more examples...
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
AlienvoordI know what I'm thinking and they're all thinking the same thing.

I see nothing remarkable about this sentence. Maybe if they gave more examples...
Yes, if one has cash, one can download the article. I don't have it to spare.
MilkyHey, Canadians, what's your take on this?
Do you have a take on it, Milky?
LOL! What is your 'Position', Milky. I think MrP has already given a short and good explanation.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
(Is there an echo in here?)
AnonymousLOL! What is your 'Position', Milky. I think MrP has already given a short and good explanation.
Is it your position to remain anonymous?
Mike In Japan
MilkyHey, Canadians, what's your take on this?



Do you have a take on it, Milky?

No I don't. You?

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