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On 13 Mar 2005, retrosorter wrote Good lord: is that somehow unacceptable in AmEng?

I don't know that there is an established AmE usage about this. The usage is legitimately deprecated when not used ... these examples as strong and the second as weak. "As well," should not link them as equally important supporting statements.

I'll snip the rest; thanks for the explanatory argument.

I take it that your "most people", though, should be "most people using standard AmEng", and the "should not" to be equally place-specific.

Using "as well" as a direct synonym of "in addition/also" is entirely idiomatic to me, and the reasoning you've offered, whilst understandable, seems overly pedantic and unidiomatic.

A true Am/Can difference, I guess.

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
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On 13 Mar 2005, retrosorter wrote Good lord: is that somehow unacceptable in AmEng?

Thinking about it out of context, (I would say that) starting a sentence with "As well" sounds wrong. Is this acceptable in BrE, etc., in addition to CanE?

I think so; I haven't noticed people faint when (or more accurately, if) I've used the form.
I have noted that British people use "as well" more often than Americans do (that is, British speakers will use "as well" in sentences where the American will reach first for "also" or "too"), which is not to say that Americans don't use "as well".

Interesting; I'd not clocked that. (I'll listen more closely now.)

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
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I agree Harvey. It sounds quite normal for Canadian spoken English to me. I'd hesitate to use it in formal written English.

Oh, same here: I don't think I'd write it, but it sounds entirely idiomatic as spoken English.

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
On 13 Mar 2005, Areff wrote

Thinking about it out of context, (I would say that) ... Is this acceptable in BrE, etc., in addition to CanE?

I think so; I haven't noticed people faint when (or more accurately, if) I've used the form.

I bet there was a good deal of blenching, though! (It's definitely not standard.)
Matti
On 13 Mar 2005, Areff wrote

snip
I think so; I haven't noticed people faint when (or more accurately, if) I've used the form.

I bet there was a good deal of blenching, though! (It's definitely not standard.)

It's probably "if", then. I like to think I'd have noticed, but who knows?
For what it's worth, it's not a construction I'm conscious of using, but it sounds sufficiently unremarkable to me that I might have..dunno.

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
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On 13 Mar 2005, John Kane wrote

I agree Harvey. It sounds quite normal for Canadian spoken English to me. I'd hesitate to use it in formal written English.

Oh, same here: I don't think I'd write it, but it sounds entirely idiomatic as spoken English.

It (starting a sentence with 'As well') certainly looks odd to me in England, and I'd never even have thought of using it in speech or writing.
But I've just watched a BBC TV programme 'Supervolcano' and noticed an ostensibly American character start a sentence with it (about 10 minutes into the one-hour part 1 of 2). I checked the credits and as much as I could read before it flashed off the screen indicated a BBC-only production, though it is set in Yellowstone National Park and there were plenty of apparently genuine American actors playing the parts of American nationals ('the locals').

Paul
In bocca al Lupo!
But I've just watched a BBC TV programme 'Supervolcano' and noticed an ostensibly American character start a sentence with it ... Yellowstone National Park and there were plenty of apparently genuine American actors playing the parts of American nationals ('the locals').

Do you recognize that the American characters in the Rumpole mysteries and in As Time Goes By are most definitely not played by American actors?
Maybe your British scriptwriter heard a Canadian use a sentence-initial "as well" and took it to be an Americanism and threw it in as a supposed marker of Americanism.

Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
On 13 Mar 2005, John Kane wrote Oh, same here: I don't think I'd write it, but it sounds entirely idiomatic as spoken English.

It (starting a sentence with 'As well') certainly looks odd to me in England, and I'd never even have thought ... Yellowstone National Park and there were plenty of apparently genuine American actors playing the parts of American nationals ('the locals').

It wouldn't be the first or second time the British television (or film) productions have used Canadians to play the part of Americans, often with outrageous dialectal consequences.

Steny '08!
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Peter T. Daniels had it:
But I've just watched a BBC TV programme 'Supervolcano' and ... American actors playing the parts of American nationals ('the locals').

Do you recognize that the American characters in the Rumpole mysteries and in As Time Goes By are most definitely not played by American actors?

There aren't any American characters in "As Time Goes By".

David
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