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Seattle English isn't like Canadian English, because there hasn't been close, continuous communication between them.
Nothing to do with "major American city." That was your contribution.
Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
Seattle English isn't like Canadian English, because there hasn't been close, continuous communication between them.

So you'd think. But I've noticed some similarities between the speech of some Seattle natives and that of celebrated Canadian Alan Thicke.

I mean, apart from the mutual CICness.

I repeat: Erk, this can't be!
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There's been a rail connection since the 1890s. Before that ... towns, but...again I'm forced to ask: What is your point?

Seattle English isn't like Canadian English, because there hasn't been close, continuous communication between them. Nothing to do with "major American city." That was your contribution.

It was an attempt to make a little more precise why you were wrong in saying that "Seattle is not particularly close to Canada". (Areff wanted to argue about "major American city", which was irrelevant.) Turns out what you would like to say (now at least) is "Seattle English isn't like Canadian English", which may be true, though there's no reason why a particular expression such as "skid road" should not have arrived in Seattle from Canada via the logging industry. But I don't think "close, continuous communication" (or its alleged lack) is particularly useful as an explanation here. It would have much more to do with different patterns of immigration consequent on the existence of an international boundary between the two places since the beginnings of white settlement.
Ross Clark
Seattle English isn't like Canadian English, because there hasn't been close, continuous communication between them.

So you'd think. But I've noticed some similarities between the speech of some Seattle natives and that of celebrated Canadian Alan Thicke. I mean, apart from the mutual CICness.

Have you heard anyone from Redby/Red Lake, Minnesota, talking?(1) The people I heard sound very Canadian. (The area is the home of a Chippewa Indian Reservation. On Mapquest, it looks to be about 80 miles from Manitoba, and a bit closer to Ontario. )
(1)Some Redby/Red Lake residents were being interviewed on TV recently, in the wake of the horrible shooting deaths at Red Lake High School. Sad, bad news.
Maria Conlon
So you'd think. But I've noticed some similarities between the ... Canadian Alan Thicke. I mean, apart from the mutual CICness.

Have you heard anyone from Redby/Red Lake, Minnesota, talking?(1)

Not consciously, but I did hear some people interviewed on the news recently who I gather must have been from that area.

Minnesotans(1) do sound very Canadian to me. What's more, they look Canadian, think Canadian, act Canadian, and walk like Canadians. Heck, they even have flappy heads and beady eyes, though not in the same way that Ontarians do.
Did I tell you guys about the time I was stuck in a lodge in northern Minnesota last fall? Guess what was the only thing on TV? Yep. The Red Green Show at least as popular in Minnesota as it is in Canada.

And Ron moved to that country? What gives? I'll take Estuary English any day. Maybe Ron's in a better spot, though. Chuck was almost there, up in Bellingham, but he didn't seem to take to it.
(1)By "Minnesotans" I mean natives of Minnesota with strong accents. I've heard natives of Minnesota with weak accents who only give away where they're from when they pronounce "house" like (hA.ws) or whatever. And Minneapolis Ray Wise is from Central Illinois (North of Egypt), so he sounds Southern, like he's from Tennessee, or so I've heard.

I repeat: Erk, this can't be!
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Have you heard anyone from Redby/Red Lake, Minnesota, talking?(1)

Not consciously, but I did hear some people interviewed on the news recently who I gather must have been from ... Wise is from Central Illinois (North of Egypt), so he sounds Southern, like he's from Tennessee, or so I've heard.

You didn't hear it from me, however. I don't really think of people from Tennessee as "sounding Southern" they have an accent all their own. People from Egypt only sound sort of Southern to me (H. Allen Smith being an example), and Burl Ives, born north of Egypt but south from where I grew up doesn't usually sound Southern to me either when he was using his normal speaking voice.
It is true that people from the East and here in the Upper Midwest, and at least one person from Virginia (but from the area surrounding Washington) have told me that I sound Southern to them, but I rather doubt that any of them had Kentucky or Tennessee in mind when they used that term.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com