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Peter T. Daniels had it:

Do you recognize that the American characters in the Rumpole mysteries and in As Time Goes By are most definitely not played by American actors?

There aren't any American characters in "As Time Goes By".

Making it even easier to have Canadians play them.

Liebs
(snip)
Do you recognize that the American characters in the Rumpole mysteries and in As Time Goes By are most definitely not played by American actors?

There aren't any American characters in "As Time Goes By".

Not true, there were the Hollywood producer and agent who were doing Lionel's book into a movie as well as a couple of people, IIRC,at the time of the shooting of the movie.

David Wright Sr.
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Peter T. Daniels had it:

Do you recognize that the American characters in the Rumpole mysteries and in As Time Goes By are most definitely not played by American actors?

There aren't any American characters in "As Time Goes By".

Did you miss the entire "miniseries" arc?

Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
It wouldn't be the first or second time the British television (or film) productions have used Canadians to play the part of Americans, often with outrageous dialectal consequences.

Of course it's the scriptwriters we ought to be considering, as far as the actual words rather than their sounds go.
I've experienced a flashback since my excited posting and can add to the credits The Discovery Channel. I don't know where that hails from.
Paul
In bocca al Lupo!
It wouldn't be the first or second time the British ... play the part of Americans, often with outrageous dialectal consequences.

Of course it's the scriptwriters we ought to be considering, as far as the actual words rather than their sounds go.

True, at least in some cases. We have this problem intra-US too. See the thread I started a while back on how scriptwriters for episodes of The Sopranos have had New Jersey characters using the Midwesternism (found, for example, in ErkE(1)) "come with"/"go with".
(1)ObSparkE: Evan R. Kirshenbaum English, the westernmost subdialect of ChiE(2).
(2)ObSparkE: Chicago English.

Steny '08!
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On 13 Mar 2005, retrosorter wrote Good lord: is that somehow unacceptable in AmEng?

Of course, and I don't recall hearing it in BrE at the start of a sentence, either.

Charles Riggs
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"as

Similar in what way? Ross Clark

Other expressions that are more prevalent in Canadian English. For example, Canadians are liable to say "Have you got a match?" whereas in the USA "Do you have a match?" would be more common.

Well, as you have seen, people's impressions are not always confirmed by the impressions of others. If you find anything on Canada-USA differences that is supported by something more than impressions, please let the group know. I know of a couple of things, but they are pretty old.
Ross Clark
Other expressions that are more prevalent in Canadian English. For ... USA "Do you have a match?" would be more common.

Well, as you have seen, people's impressions are not always confirmed by the impressions of others. If you find anything ... more than impressions, please let the group know. I know of a couple of things, but they are pretty old.[/nq]There are a few vocab items, such as 'chesterfield' for 'couch' - but this is virtually confined to people over the age of 55. Then there are things like the name 'zed' instead of 'zee' for the last letter of the alphabet (despite the best attempts of Sesame Street to convert people to 'zee' - it got beaten out of kids once they hit school, where it's not cool to sound 'American').

There are a few other things - a long sandwich is a 'sub' rather than a 'hero'; a can of fizzy drink is a 'pop' rather than a 'soda' or a 'coke' (unless it does happen to be Coca-Cola for the last). I remember a friend of mine who walked into a fast-food place and asked the server, 'Can I have a Coke please?' She responds, 'You want a Sprite?'
Are there regions of the States where 'Canadian raising' in the /ai/ and /au/ diphthongs occurs? I remember a visiting youth orchestra from Alabama who - while they didn't normally speak with the stereotypical drawl - did have a raised diphthong for the letter /o/. It was interesting: in the phrase 'go out' they had a raised diphthong for the first word but not the second; we on the other hand had a raised diphthong for the second but not the first.

The Alabamans used 'coke' for all fizzy drinks. The other interesting thing was that to them, us Canadians were all 'Yankees' because we were from up North; this came up because one of us called them Yankees for being from the States! They also told us that where they were from, there were three races of people: white, black, or Mexican. When I practised my drawl (y'all come back now, y'hear!) someone said, 'Not bad, for a Mexican!'
Neeraj Mathur
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According to Garner's Modern American Usage, substiting the phrase"as well" for "also" or "in addition" at the start of a sentence is perfectly acceptable in Canadian English. Does anyone know of any similar examples stemming from Canadian English?

To broaden the discussion slightly, I've noticed in Updike's novels that people often end sentences with the tag "... , is all." Is this common in (a) the USA & (b) Canada? It would sound odd in the UK.

Nigel
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