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David Wright Sr. had it:
(snip)

There aren't any American characters in "As Time Goes By".

Not true, there were the Hollywood producer and agent who were doing Lionel's book into a movie as well as a couple of people, IIRC,at the time of the shooting of the movie.

If you say so; I don't remember them.

David
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replace usenet with the
To broaden the discussion slightly, I've noticed in Updike's novels that people often end sentences with the tag "... , is all." Is this common in (a) the USA & (b) Canada? It would sound odd in the UK.

(a) Yes. (b) Ask the folks with the beady eyes and flappy heads.

Steny '08!
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To broaden the discussion slightly, I've noticed in Updike's novels that people often end sentences with the tag "... , is all." Is this common in (a) the USA & (b) Canada? It would sound odd in the UK.

I know this was discussed in a.u.e in the past, but all I turn up in this one discussion from last July:

That doesn't address your question of who it is who says this final "is all." I think it's a 20th century thing; the old books at Mastertexts have "that is all" or "that's all," on both sides of the pond.

Best Donna Richoux
Well, as you have seen, people's impressions are not always ... of a couple of things, but they are pretty old.

There are a few vocab items, such as 'chesterfield' for 'couch' - but this

And /tuwk/ for a knit cap, apparently spelled
is virtually confined to people over the age of 55. Then there are things like the name 'zed' instead of ... to sound 'American'). There are a few other things - a long sandwich is a 'sub' rather than a 'hero';

Oh, is the Subway chain a Canadian corporation? "Sub" is short for "submarine sandwich," but the sandwich chain related it to "subway" and used to be decorated with wallpaper of old NY subway maps.

a can of fizzy drink is a 'pop' rather than a 'soda'

not a Canadianism!
or a 'coke' (unless it does happen to be Coca-Cola for the last). I remember a friend of mine who walked into a fast-food place and asked the server, 'Can I have a Coke please?' She responds, 'You want a Sprite?'

Peculiar, since Sprite is made by the Coca-Cola Company; it must have meant they were out of cola sirup.
Are there regions of the States where 'Canadian raising' in the /ai/ and

Milwaukee
/au/ diphthongs occurs? I remember a visiting youth orchestra from Alabama who - while they didn't normally speak with the ... first word but not the second; we on the other hand had a raised diphthong for the second but not

not Canadian, but Southern
the first. The Alabamans used 'coke' for all fizzy drinks. The other interesting thing was that to them, us Canadians ... black, or Mexican. When I practised my drawl (y'all come back now, y'hear!) someone said, 'Not bad, for a Mexican!'

Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
David Wright Sr. had it:

(snip) Not true, there were the Hollywood producer and agent ... people, IIRC,at the time of the shooting of the movie.

If you say so; I don't remember them.

The "miniseries" arc seems to have continued for at least two seasons. You don't remember the several episodes when they went to Hollywood??
Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
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Not true, there were the Hollywood producer and agent who ... of people, IIRC,atthe time of the shooting of the movie.

If you say so; I don't remember them.

I watched those episodes not too long ago, and was struck by how badly the actor playing the American producer imitated an American accent. It made me wonder if American actors attempting British accents sounded as painful to British ears.
I watched those episodes not too long ago, and was struck by howbadly the actor playing the American producer imitated an Americanaccent. It made me wonder if American actors attempting British accents sounded as painful to British ears.

Wonder no more: to this Anglicized ear they do. Paltrow and maybe Tailwagger excepted, of course. I thought Mortensson was good, too, till Areff told me that was actually a natural NY accent.

Mike.
To me, the most cringe-inducing American accents by British actors are found in Radio 4 plays: supposed Americans in those invariably sound like a cartoon version of something by Raymond Chandler.

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
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On 13 Mar 2005, retrosorter wrote Good lord: is that somehow unacceptable in AmEng?

Thinking about it out of context, (I would say that) starting a sentence with "As well" sounds wrong. Is this ... the American will reach first for "also" or "too"), which is not to say that Americans don't use "as well".

Where do the put the stress?
Here there is a generation gap.
Those under 30 says "AS well..."
Those over 30 say "As WELL.."

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
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