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Getting back to your original question..
As an American immigrant to Canada, who's also a wannabe linguist, I tend to notice this stuff (though not as much now as when I first arrived 11 years ago).
So here's a good one:
"Done" and "finished" as verbal adjectives can take a direct object in Canadian English.
"I'm done my homework." = "I'm done with my homework." "When you're finished this project.." = "When you're finished with this project.."
The former form is more commonly heard round here than the latter, but both are acceptable. The former is not acceptable in US English, and will likely be mis-heard as "I've done my homework" and "When you've finished this project.."
Interestingly, if you query adult Canadians about this usage, you'll likely get the response "I don't say it that way!"...even immediately after their having said it that way. Then you can challenge them to repeat the phrase, and when they do so as described, they're surprised at themselves. (Try it; it's fun!) So there is some sense that it isn't standard English.
Canadian kids (including my own Canadianized kids) have no sense that there is anything non-standard about this usage.
BTW: "As well" at the start of a sentence is just as acceptable written as spoken. I see it in newspapers and hear it in newscasts.
I don't see any real dialect differences between my neighborhood and that of my parents, West Rogers Park, which is ... in Chicago seemed to vary more on a north-south axis than an east-west axis, at least up where I was.

I don't disagree with this. I've noticed one major dialectal division in Chicago (not counting special cases like the dialects of African-Americans descended from northern migrations during the earlier 20th century), which I call the Sipowicz-Farina(1)/Bosley-Siskel split, which I gather (thanks in part to some helpful information from Murray Arnow ITNG some years ago) is essentially a south-north one.
(1)There's clearly some AUE reader-joker who writes for the NBC TV series Law and Order (my guesses: R J Valentine or a moonlighting Ben Zimmer, or maybe a lurker). The replacement for the (now late, but then semi-retiring) Jerry Orbach (a Bronx native, though he went to college at Northwestern) is ex-Chicago cop (or should I say "caap") Dennis Farina, whose character was given the name "Detective Fontana".

They've even worked his Chicago background into the plot of one or so episodes. Contrast that with Andy Sipowicz on NYPD Blue , who is, to my knowledge, never acknowledged to have a Chicago accent (despite it being at least as strong as Farina's) and who is even supposed to have grown up in Brooklyn (FLCIA). NBC deserves some credit for having a little bit of dialectal honesty.

Steny '08!
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As an American immigrant to Canada, who's also a wannabe linguist,

Huh? (Hi Liebs!)

Steny '08!
"Done" and "finished" as verbal adjectives can take a direct object in Canadian English. "I'm done my homework." = "I'm ... this project.." Canadian kids (including my own Canadianized kids) have no sense that there is anything non-standard about this usage.

Count me in that category - is it really not acceptable in other dialects? It seems so natural to me. (I've lived in Canada since I was four; I've been in Britain the last three years to do my degree.)
BTW: "As well" at the start of a sentence is just as acceptable written as spoken. I see it in newspapers and hear it in newscasts.

This one, I have trouble with. I can't bring myself to actually pronounce it, even when reading the examples. It sounds thoroughly odd. I'll pay attention next time I go back to the people around me, but perhaps the region it applies to is distinctly less broad than 'Canada'? (I'm from the Toronto area).
Neeraj Mathur
I've lived in Canada most of my life and I've never heard a construction "I'm done my homework..." I've heard the other one, "When you're finished this project you.. " Where in Canada is the first construction prevalent?
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I've lived in Canada most of my life and I've never heard a construction "I'm done my homework..." I've heard the other one, "When you're finished this project you.. " Where in Canada is the first construction prevalent?

I'm not sure about 'I'm done my homework', but certainly, 'Are you done your homework yet?' is fine to me. I'm from Mississauga.

Neeraj Mathur
For some reason, Canadians on South Park are always portrayed as having spherical heads whose entire top opens (at the equator) when they talk. Very few actual Canadians I've met are built that way.

Why, thank you, Sir!
aokay
Well, as you have seen, people's impressions are not always ... of a couple of things, but they are pretty old.

There are a few vocab items, such as 'chesterfield' for 'couch' - but this is virtually confined to people over ... Mexican. When I practised my drawl (y'all come back now, y'hear!) someone said, 'Not bad, for a Mexican!' Neeraj Mathur

I think you make my point. "zed" is indeed US vs non-US; "chesterfield" is probably a Canadianism but, as you say, obsolescent. But "sub", "pop" and "Canadian raising" are all to be found in the USA. The various regional names for the long sandwich have been extensively discussed, e.g.
http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/HoagieSubmarinePoBoy.htm

and there's even a web page devoted to "pop" vs. "soda":

http://www.popvssoda.com /
Ross Clark
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There are a few vocab items, such as 'chesterfield' for 'couch' - but this

And /tuwk/ for a knit cap, apparently spelled

Yup, forgot that one.
There are a few other things - a long sandwich is a 'sub' rather than a 'hero';

Oh, is the Subway chain a Canadian corporation? "Sub" is short for "submarine sandwich," but the sandwich chain related it to "subway" and used to be decorated with wallpaper of old NY subway maps.

I'm not actually sure about Subway. It's possible that they brought the sandwich and the name 'sub' with them, but I have no idea. On the other hand, there is a Canadian sandwich chain called 'Mr. Sub'. No idea which came when.
I remember a friend of mine who walked into a ... have a Coke please?' She responds, 'You want a Sprite?'

Peculiar, since Sprite is made by the Coca-Cola Company; it must have meant they were out of cola sirup.

I don't think so, because if I remember correctly he simply said, 'No, I want a Coke' and received one. To us it was just a ridiculous waitress; the real humour of course came from his deadpan manner in relating the story.
Are there regions of the States where 'Canadian raising' in the /ai/ and

Milwaukee

So is it a continuum down to there? Does it spread east-west at all?
/au/ diphthongs occurs? I remember a visiting youth orchestra from ... hand had a raised diphthong for the second but not

not Canadian, but Southern

I think I actually described what the Southerners did incorrectly: rather than raising the first element of the /o/ phoneme, they fronted it; the /g/ was also palatalised slightly. Us Canadians pronounced 'go' in the more or less 'Standard American' way, but raised the first element of the diphthong in 'out'. It was just funny to compare how neither us nor them pronounced the phrase in the 'standard' way.I find it striking that raising is so widely spread across Canada. On the other hand, there are regional accents across the country, of course. Westerners (especially the more rural type) have a very distinct accent, one which I can't quite mimic, largely because my only exposure to it is in things like interviews with Olympic athletes. It has a very odd rhoticism to it - at least that's my impression. My sister's been living in Vancouver for the last few years, and I'm sure her speech has changed slightly, though I can't quite describe how.

One of the annoying things she now does is greet people with 'Hi there!' with that really nails-on-blackboard intonation pattern. To this Ontarian it sounds very patronizing (although it's not meant to be); I'm sure it's not something she ever did when she was in Toronto!
Neeraj Mathur
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