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My CED describes "a dog's dinner or breakfast" as (Informal) something that is messy or bungled. Fine, that's what I expected. However, "like a dog's dinner" is described as (Informal) dressed smartly or ostentatiously.
Hmmm, if somebody told me I looked like a dog's dinner tonight should I take it as a compliment, or shouldn't I?

Paul JK
Another distincion between Cdn and Amer usage is the words overlook/lookout. I remember being on a trip with an American friend who refered to "scenic overlooks." In Canada, the term "overlook" is rare and people will almost always use the word "lookout."
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Another distincion between Cdn and Amer usage is the words overlook/lookout. I remember being on a trip with an American friend who refered to "scenic overlooks." In Canada, the term "overlook" is rare and people will almost always use the word "lookout."

But a lookout is a scout who goes before the main body of the army to check for hostile presence, or who is mounted in a tower/on the mast to be vigilant.

Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
When you file this story, don't forget to include a cross-reference to the "Oakland/Auckland" urban legend..r

If it's a legend, it's one that started with fact.

Auckward Landing"They talk different," was his simple though slightly daft explanation. Before Michael Lewis' Air New Zealand flight from London landed in Los Angeles, the flight attendant told passengers traveling on to Auckland to wait in the lounge until an announcement of the flight. Lewis, hearing "Oakland," complied. When a New Zealand official announced what Lewis thought was the airline's connecting flight to Oakland, he boarded and then settled into his seat for the one-hour flight.

Less than ten minutes after takeoff, an elderly woman sitting near him commented that they had 13 more hours of flying time. It began to dawn on Lewis that he might have taken a slight detour. Some 13,000 miles later, after spending twelve hours in New Zealand's largest city, he arrived back in Los Angeles. Lewis, an ingenuous though perhaps a bit flighty student at Sacramento City College, is having his moment in the media sun. He has appeared on the Tonight show ("Auckland is a really nice city," he told Johnny, describing his bus tour), and two major networks are said to be vying for the rights to his accidental odyssey.
Time , April 15, 1985

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >English is about as pure as a
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >cribhouse ***. We don't justPalo Alto, CA 94304 >borrow words; on occasion, English
Another distincion between Cdn and Amer usage is the words ... rare and people will almost always use the word "lookout."

One of the definitions the Cdn Oxford Dic gives for "lookout" is a "view over a landscape."
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Another distincion between Cdn and Amer usage is the words ... rare and people will almost always use the word "lookout."

But a lookout is a scout who goes before the main body of the army to check for hostile presence, or who is mounted in a tower/on the mast to be vigilant.

Not in these parts. It's where you go for the view. There's some uncertainty
about how to stress the word in its geographical use, though: for many years,
weather reporters for Northern Ontario would pronounce "Sioux Lookout" (a town) as if warning their sister. CDB
It's standard here in Oz. Yes, I've been one too. What do they call them in the USA?

Since I haven't yet seen it defined, I can't be sure, but I suspect that 'poll watchers' at least comes close.

Or maybe "election observers". As I recall, there was a lot of talk about observers before the last election.
"Scutineer" is also used in road racing, if Google is to be believed, in the UK and Australia. I assume it's some sort of judge or timekeeper.

Ray Heindl
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Still more:
We "lay charges" (rather than "press" or "file" them) for a "Crown offence" (felony, more or less). If injured, we go "to hospital" and stay "in hospital" like the British do.
We go to "college" for two years; we go "to university" (not "to the university") for four. There, we "write exams" rather than "take" them. If someone knows that you have a 4-year degree and you say "when I was in college", that someone will look at you funny: "I thought you went to university."
We also actually say "mind you" without meaning to sound twee (e.g. "Mind you, he needed the crap kicked out of him.")

And here's a favourite: "asphalt" is pronounced as though it were spelt "ashphalt".
You shouldn't have got me started..
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Still more: We "lay charges" (rather than "press" or "file" them) for a "Crown offence" (felony, more or less). If injured, we go "to hospital" and stay "in hospital" like the British do.

When you table a motion, do you start talking about it, or stop talking about it?
We go to "college" for two years; we go "to university" (not "to the university") for four. There, we "write exams" rather than "take" them.

What about orals?

Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
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