According to Garner's Modern American Usage, substiting the phrase "as well" for "also" or "in addition" at the start of a sentence is perfectly acceptable in Canadian English. Does anyone know of any similar examples stemming from Canadian English?
Thanks
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According to Garner's Modern American Usage, substiting the phrase "as well" for "also" or "in addition" at the start of a sentence is perfectly acceptable in Canadian English.

Good lord: is that somehow unacceptable in AmEng?

(The things one learns in here: it's never struck me even remotely as a solecism.)

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
On 13 Mar 2005, retrosorter wrote

According to Garner's Modern American Usage, substiting the phrase "as ... start of a sentence is perfectly acceptable in Canadian English.

Good lord: is that somehow unacceptable in AmEng?

To this particular American set of ears, something like "As well, he speaks French like a native" sounds unidiomatic. "Unacceptable" is perhaps a bit strong. It comes as news to me that it's idiomatic in Canadian English.
(The things one learns in here: it's never struck me even remotely as a solecism.)

Yabbut you're a Canadian. NTTAWWT.

Liebs
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I guess it's a Canajun thing, then; this looks entirely OK to me:

"He speaks English, Norwegian and French. As well, he can read but not speak Italian and Russian."

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
According to Garner's Modern American Usage, substiting the phrase "as well" for "also" or "in addition" at the start of a sentence is perfectly acceptable in Canadian English. Does anyone know of any similar examples stemming from Canadian English? Thanks

Similar in what way?
Ross Clark
On 13 Mar 2005, retrosorter wrote

According to Garner's Modern American Usage, substiting the phrase "as ... start of a sentence is perfectly acceptable in Canadian English.

Good lord: is that somehow unacceptable in AmEng?

I don't know that there is an established AmE usage about this. The usage is legitimately deprecated when not used carefully, and may be rough style even then."As well," as an introductory clause at the start of a sentence functions similarly to "Furthermore," "Moreover," "For a 3rd point," (or whatever number in sequence), "Also," and "In addition," and so on. These function as links from the introduced supporting statement to a preceding supporting statement about an assertion. Some of these introductory phrases have different argumentative function. The phrase "as well" indicates equal probative or illustrative value, compared to the preceding supporting statement.

It is short for "shows equally well" or "shows as well as" or similar phrase. Example: "Mary raided the cookie jar. There are cookie crumbs on her hands. Chocolate smears on her face around her mouth equally well prove this. Her guilty look and refusal to open her mouth when I ask her about her hands and face demonstrate this as well as the first two facts do."
It is sloppy or illogical to use "As well," rather than "Also," or "In addition," when assignment of equal probative or illustrative value is not intended. Examples of sloppy use:
"Ted is the one who messed up my car's engine. He's got dirty greasy smears on his clothes and hands. As well, he's one of 50 people around here tall enough to reach into the engine compartment."

"People need air free of smog. Doctors have proven that smog can cause respiratory illnesses in everyone who breathes it. As well, some people in Los Angeles might consider it unattractive to look at despite other's thinking it makes for a picturesque sky at sunset, or so I've heard."
Most people would recognize the first supporting statement in these examples as strong and the second as weak. "As well," should not link them as equally important supporting statements.
Even if "As well," is carefully used as to argumentative implications, or if a cultural convention removes any implication of one supporting statement serving as well as another and there is no argumentative implication, it can be confusing or distracting to start a sentence "As well,".
"Well" usually modifies another word in the sense of "well" applicable to "As well,". Confusion or distraction can arise from starting a sentence with a word figuratively 'hungry' for another word to modify when that word modified is distant from the introduction, or it turns out that after the sentence is completely read that what "well" modifies is "understood".
On the other hand, one may argue that "As well," should be at the start of a sentence because it is reaching out to to the preceding sentence to show what is equally suitability as illustration or proof in comparison. Also, familiarity with the usage might prevent distraction.
Another possible argument about confusion from starting out a sentence with "As well," is that "as" may serve as a coordinating conjunction, so whether a new sentence is being started or a coordinating clause is being set up can be confusing momentarily. This would matter more in speech than writing. It is a meager point, which I end on.
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On 13 Mar 2005, retrosorter wrote

According to Garner's Modern American Usage, substiting the phrase "as ... start of a sentence is perfectly acceptable in Canadian English.

Good lord: is that somehow unacceptable in AmEng?

Thinking about it out of context, (I would say that) starting a sentence with "As well" sounds wrong. Is this acceptable in BrE, etc., in addition to CanE?
I have noted that British people use "as well" more often than Americans do (that is, British speakers will use "as well" in sentences where the American will reach first for "also" or "too"), which is not to say that Americans don't use "as well".

Steny '08!
I agree Harvey.
It sounds quite normal for Canadian spoken English to me. I'd hesitate to use it in formal written English.
John Kane
Kingston ON Canada
According to Garner's Modern American Usage, substiting the phrase"as well" ... know of any similar examples stemming from Canadian English? Thanks

Similar in what way? Ross Clark

Other expressions that are more prevalent in Canadian English. For example, Canadians are liable to say "Have you got a match?" whereas in the USA "Do you have a match?" would be more common.
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