Hello everybody:-) I'm currently writing MA thesis concerning Canadian English. My practical section of this dissertation is to involve the analysis of Canadian Vocabulary and I do need your help (especially of Native CANADIANS). I would be REALLY grateful if U could give me answers to the following survey:

1. Which way of spelling do U prefer: odour/odor, colour/color, centre/center, foetus/fetus, licence/license, dialogue/dialog, jewellery/jewelery, criticise/criticize, formulae/formulas, tyre/tire, program/programme

2.Do U ever use any of these words (if yes how often): serviette, chesterfield

3. Which words do you use in everyday life: autumn/fall, biscuit/cookie, chemist's/drugstore, crisps/chips, football/soccer, garden/yard, lift/elevator

Thx also for filling these info:

Age:

Sex:

Province and territory (if you are a Canadian):

Town:

Education (primary/secondary/ higher education):
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1. Which way of spelling do U prefer: odour/odor, colour/color, centre/center, foetus/fetus, licence/license, dialogue/dialog, jewellery/jewelery, criticise/criticize, formulae/formulas, tyre/tire, program/programme

2.Do U ever use any of these words (if yes how often): serviette, chesterfield Never

You need to provide the definition you were looking for in #3. Biscuit, in American English, has its own defintion, and so does football. Likewise, garden and yard, etc. If I followed the question directly ask asked, I'd choose all of them except crisps and chemists. Likewise, others will choose chips to mean "French fries."

3. Which words do you use in everyday life: autumn/fall - both, but probably fall more often, biscuit - this is a type of bread - I do use it, but not to mean cookie/cookie, chemist's/drugstore, crisps/chips, football - I call American football just "football"/soccer to mean what everyone else calls football, garden - these have flowers/yard - this you mow, lift - of course I use the word "lift" but not to mean elevator/elevator

Thx also for filling these info:

Age: 40

Sex: F

Province and territory (if you are a Canadian): And if we're not Canadian?

Town:

Education (primary/secondary/ higher education): master's
Hi GG

I didn't know jewelery existed! Are you sure they use it in Canada? Jewellery is British and jewelry is American.

Cheers
CB
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Hell, I don't know. It's not MY survey. I'm just a respondent.

(All I know is that I say it funny: JEWL-ree, not jew-ell-ree)
1. Which way of spelling do U prefer: odour/odor, colour/color, centre/center, foetus/fetus, licence/license, dialogue/dialog, jewellery/jewelery(which i say jewl-ree), criticise/criticize, formulae/formulas, tyre/tire, program/programme

2.Do U ever use any of these words (if yes how often): serviette(as often as napkin), chesterfield(never)

3. Which words do you use in everyday life: autumn/fall(both but fall more comonly), biscuit/cookie(biscuit but not to mean a cookie, cookie to mean a cookie), chemist's/drugstore, crisps/chips(meaning potato chips, not french fries), football/soccer(football means american football, soccer means everyone else's football), garden/yard(garden has flowers, yard you mow), lift/elevator(as was said, of course i saw lift but it doesn't mean an elevator)

Thx also for filling these info:

Age: 21

Sex: m

Province and territory (if you are a Canadian): BC

Town: Kamloops

Education (primary/secondary/ higher education): University Student
>> (All I know is that I say it funny: JEWL-ree, not jew-ell-ree) <<

Nah, it's just one of those words with several pronunciation variants that seem to be found all over the English speaking world. Pretty much the same as for example route: rowt vs root; milk: m-ilk vs melk; caramel (2 or three syllables), I'll as Isle or All, etc. There is no real "right" way to say these words, and neither of those pronunciation dominates any particular English speaking region.
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Hi,

I beleive there is quite a lot of literature available on this topic. This includes the Canadian Oxford Dictionary that I have in front of me here, and which claims to define Canadian English. Are you hoping to add something new?

Good luck, Clive

My practical section of this dissertation is to involve the analysis of Canadian Vocabulary and I do need your help (especially of Native CANADIANS). I'm a Canadian. We use the term native Canadian to refer to what you might call Canadian Indians. I would be REALLY grateful if U could give me answers to the following survey:

1. Which way of spelling do U prefer: odour/odor, colour/color, centre/center, foetus/fetus, licence/license, dialogue/dialog, jewellery/jewelery, criticise/criticize, formulae/formulas, <<< both, depending on context.- the former in a math context tyre/tire, program/programme

2.Do U ever use any of these words (if yes how often): serviette, chesterfield No and No

3. Which words do you use in everyday life: autumn/fall, biscuit/cookie, chemist's/drugstore, crisps/chips, football/soccer, <<< both, depending on which of the two games I am speaking of garden/yard, lift/elevator

Thx also for filling these info:

Age:

Sex: M

Province and territory (if you are a Canadian): Ontario

Town: Toronto

Education (primary/secondary/ higher education):

Thank you very much for your answers! I do appreciate your help!

Contrary to your opinion there is a considerable shortage of info concerning Canadian English, especially info I'm interested in. However I don't give up and keep on searching:-) That's why, I wonder if you could help me even more. Would you talk some of your friends into answering this short survey? I believe it's not so much of trouble for you For me, your answers are invaluable source of info. I would be extremely grateful for your help!
I would happily comply, but anonymous doesn't cut it for me. It's too gratuitous.
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