From: http://www.craigmarlatt.com/canada/symbols_facts&lists/canadianisms.html

loonie
A dollar. The Canadian $1 coin has a loon (the bird) on one side.

toonie
Two dollars. The Canadian $2 coin is gold-coloured in the middle, with a silver-coloured ring around the outside. It takes its name from the $1 coin, the loonie, and adds its value, two, to form "twonie" or, more easily read, "toonie". A polar bear is on one side of this coin.

pogey
Unemployment benefits. "I'm getting pogey" means, as the British would say, "I'm on the dole."

serviette
French for "napkin". This term is used by anglophones as well as francophones.

washroom
bathroom

housecoat
robe, bathrobe

chesterfield
A couch or sofa.

poutine
Québecois specialty. French fries covered in cheese curds and gravy.

Shreddies
A brand of breakfast cereal, vaguely resembling Chex in the United States.

Smarties
Not the ones like in the United States. In Canada, Smarties are a candy resembling M&Ms. They do melt in your hand, and they're a lot sweeter.

Kraft Dinner, or KD
macaroni and cheese.

back bacon
Canadian bacon. Sometimes rolled in peameal.

brown bread
Whole wheat bread. If you are at a diner for breakfast and you ask for whole wheat toast, they'll understand you, but "brown toast" is a lot more Canadian.

homo milk
Homogenized milk. Known in the United States as whole milk.

whitener
powdery stuff to put into coffee or tea. Called "non-dairy creamer" in the United States.

whipping cream
heavy cream to the folks in the United States.

coriander
cilantro to the folks in the United States.

cooking onions
yellow onions to the folks in the United States.

butter tart
a delicious pie-like pastry cup with a butter, brown sugar, raisins, and nuts filling.

Nanaimo bars
a rich brownie like base with a custard cream layer topped with chocolate. Named for the city in British Columbia.

lineup
a line.... "There was a really long lineup for tickets to last night's hockey game."

icing sugar
powdered sugar

keener
Brown-noser, suckup, bootlicker.

table (verb)
to bring up for discussion, as in a session of Parliament.

Robertson screws
Screws (for metal or wood) with a square hole in the top rather than a straight or X-shaped one. They'd be popular in the States except that Henry Ford wanted exclusive rights to them, and Robertson (the inventor, a Canadian) refused to sell.

May Two-Four
The nickname of Victoria Day, Queen Victoria's birthday, May 24th.

two-four
A package containing twenty-four bottles of beer.

mickey
A measurement of alcohol (13 ounces: it's a flat, curved bottle, supposed to fit in your pocket, but it doesn't, really).

twenty-sixer
A bottle of liquor containing approximately 26 ounces. Those in the United States call is a fifth (one-fifth of a gallon) which is 25.6 ounces. For ease of conversation, the bottle was called a twenty-sixer. Now that we're all metric, the equivalent bottle now contains 750 milliliters.

toque
A kind of wintertime hat.

***, bum
One's hind quarters. "He kicked me in the bum".

"The States"
The United States of America. Canadians hate referring to the United States as "America", because Canadians are just as much (North) Americans as citizens of the United States are.

"chip trucks"
These are like the van driven by the ice cream man, only they sell French fries. They are most ubiquitous on the roads to "cottage country."

metric measurements
No, the temperature does not drop fifty degrees when you cross the border from the United States! Centimetres, not inches; kilometres, not miles; metres, not yards, etc.

French and English
The Government of Canada is one of the rare federal governments in the world to be completely bilingual.

milk containers
Milk comes in plastic bags as well as in cartons and jugs

hockey gear
A guy can get onto a bus wearing goalie pads, a helmet - everything but the skates - and nobody gives him a second look.

enumeration
Before elections, government representatives go door to door to register voters.

riding
Elected officials represent the people of their riding - also known as electoral districts.

Trans-Canada Highway
Canada's equivalent to the Interstate highways - is two lanes wide for most of its length. And there are huge, wide highways around the major cities. The 401 north of Toronto is twelve lanes wide in places and has recently overtaken some major highways in Los Angeles as the busiest road on the continent.

gas stations
Esso (instead of ***)
Petro Canada
Irving (only in eastern Canada)
Canadian Tire
Husky

department stores
The Bay (the Hudson's Bay Company, the oldest company in North America and possibly the world - it was incorporated on May 2, 1670)
Sears
Walmart (recent import from the United States)

banks
Toronto Dominion
Bank of Montreal
Royal Bank
The Bank of Nova Scotia
Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce

beers
Molson and Labatt are the dominant brands and they are a lot stronger than U.S. beers.

bookstores
Coles
Chapters
Indigo

doughnut shops
Tim Horton's - named after the hockey player who started the chain - are common everywhere.

Cuba vacations
Trips to Cuba are freely advertized and Cuban cigars are readily available.

health care
Nobody worries about losing a life's savings or a home because of illness - health care is universal.

weather conversations
Virutally any conversation will inevitably include a brief discussion of the weather - it is such a dominant force in Canadians' lives.

teenagers drinking
The drinking age in Québec, Manitoba, and Alberta is just 18; it's 19 in the rest of the country.

potato chips
They come in flavours such as salt and vinegar, ketchup, and "all dressed" (a collection of just about all possible seasonings - the person who suggested this one likened it to a "suicide slush" in the States).

the cottage (Central Ontario)
Every weekend during the summer, southern Ontarians go in droves from Toronto and its environs to their second homes (ranging from campers to great big houses with all the amenities) in the "cottage country" of Muskoka and the Haliburton Highlands.

the camp (Northern Ontario)
Northern Ontario's version of the cottage.

cottage country (winter style)
Every weekend during the winter, the cottage country people go back to cottage country to go snowmobiling. Gas stations are just as likely to be filling snowmobiles as cars or trucks.

the chalet (Quebec)
Every weekend during the summer, southern Quebeckers go in droves from Montreal and its environs to their cottage country (usually the Laurentians; the Eastern Townships; Burlington, Vermont; Lake Champlain, New York; or Plattsburgh, New York).

the cabin (British Columbia, Newfoundland & Labrador)
"The cabin" is where British Columbians head to on the weekends, not the cottage. Canadian author Charles Gordon wrote an entire book on this phenomenon - it's all the same place but called differently in different parts of the country. "The cottage", "the lake", etc. but in B.C., it's only "the cabin".

block heaters
Cars have electrical plugs sticking out from under the hoods to prevent engines from freezing when it's -40!

Goods and Services Tax
Just about everything is subject to the national 7% GST, except in Atlantic Canada where the provincial and GST taxes have been combined to form the HST - Harmonized Sales Tax.

British spelling
Canadians tend to write about "colour," "cheques," "theatres," and so forth. Most Canadians use the American "-ize" rather than the British "-ise" verb ending, however.

zed
Most Canadians will tell you that this is how the last letter of the alphabet is pronounced, not zee.

Bloody Caesar
It's just like a Bloody Mary, except it's made with Clamato juice instead of plain tomato juice.

eh
Canadians often end sentences with "eh" and many studies have looked into this phenomenon. It is generally agreed that Canadians do it because they are polite. The "eh" is an invitation for the listener to participate in the conversation opposed to the speaker simply stating fact after fact.

b'y
Newfoundlanders have many colloquialisms but this one, I'm told, is their version of "eh". Actually a contraction of "boy", it appears quite regularly in speech and is most commonly known from the sea shanty "I's the b'y that builds the boat, I's the b'y that sails her...."
Canadianisms, eh?

Obviously, some of these things are uniquely Canadian, such as the coins and French words, however a lot of these seem like "normalisms", i.e. not u.s., just like a lot of things are the same the world over, except for the u.s., especially names of things. I assume the writing underneath each item is what the USians refer to it as, unless it's obviously just an explanation.

-----

Serviette here too.

Interesting that you call a bathroom a washroom, what would you call a room that had a sink (so you could wash), but no bath? Or would that still be a washroom, so there's no distinction for a room with a bath?

Shreddies here too (don't worry USians, for once, you're not missing out on much).

Smarties - I've always wondered why M&M's even existed, considering they are just a crappy version of Smarties, but not significantly cheaper (in fact, they might even cost more). I suppose I should have guessed they were a U.S. thing. Bit of a ripoff though, eh? Apparently, the chap who "invented" them, saw some Spaniards eating something similar during the Spanish Civil War, I wonder if they were Smarties?

Back bacon - Are the only pigs with backs in the entirety of the Americas, in Canada? Can't say I understand why USians refer to it as Canadian bacon. It's from the Canadian part of the pig?.

Bread - confusing. When you say "whole wheat", do you mean "wholemeal"? If so, and you call wholemeal/wheat bread simply "brown", what do you call brown bread that isn't wholemeal/wheat. Here we have white, brown and wholemeal... I think, you're starting to make me wonder now [:^)] .

Homogenised milk I'm not too sure about at all. It seems to ring a bell, but I can't ever really remember talking about it and certainly not regularly, so I suppose that means one of three things; 1) All the milk here is homogenised, 2) None of the milk here is homogenised, or 3) It's so unpopular, I've never come across it.

Whipping cream here too. Strange the USians go for "heavy" considering it's designed for whipping, plus, once it is whipped, it's light and fluffy. Also, if they just use a light, medium and heavy grading, what do they call clotted cream?

Coriander here too. Cilantro sounds like a liqueur.

Onions - No idea, I don't cook and I don't really eat onions.

Icing sugar here too. Again, a different name in the u.s. Although the adjective isn't inappropriate, why not icing sugar? Is it used for many other things, too?

Table here too.

Robertson screwdrivers here too apparently, but I don't know how popular they are. I haven't heard of them before now, but I'm a layman. I think in Canada, everyone has heard of them, right?

***/bum, of course. *** is the real name for which donkey is slang. However, the word has, of course, been subverted the world over, and if someone says "***", you know they're an USian (unless it's a bible quote, of course).

The states/the u.s. - Yes, America is a continent (or apparently, two, depending on where you're taught, can anyone confirm this?), but I'm sure you still call them "Americans" (they are of course, it's just not their nationality). I've been pondering for a while what to refer to them as (something a little more official than "yanks"). As you can see, your mention of this has prompted me to refer to them as USians in this post. I can't quite bring myself to say it out loud though, I'm sure everyone would just look at me funny Emotion: stick out tongue . Also, how would it be pronounced, yoo'ess'ee'ns or us'ee'ns? I'm leaning towards the latter for some reason.

"Chip trucks" - Slightly strange that you say "truck" rather than "van", but *** strange that you say "chip". I thought your chips/fries/crisps naming conventions had been completely taken over by the u.s. version. For the record, here, chips are chunks of potato approximately an inch thick, by about 1/4 to 1/2 an inch thick, by the length of the potato long, deep fried. Fries (not French, because they're not) are very thin, dry, stiff, crunchy on the outside, powdery on the inside "potato" about 1/4 of an inch square by the length of the potato, that you get with Burger King, McDonalds and KFC (the ones at KFC can be less stiff and dry, more floppy, and less powdery inside unlike the ones at Burger King and McDonalds, although for all I know, that could just be the plebs at my local KFC not "cooking" them "properly"). Crisps are the thin, crisp, flavoured snacks that come in a small plastic bag, or more recently, a cardboard tube (Pringles). They are either made from very thin slices of potato, corn or moulded potato slop (they (Pringles) like to call it "dough").

Milk in bags? Sounds enormous fun, not too practical though, perhaps you could elaborate? Also, if you can buy it in jugs, how is it sealed, or is it not sealed because you just mean bought from the farmer down the road?

We have Esso (not ***, is that the same thing with just a different name?), all the others you mention sound very Canadian.

Never heard of Molson or Labatt (I'm sure they're local brands), but I'm glad to hear you don't partake of the gant's *** the USians like to call "beer". I thought that could easily be a habit that might cross the border. I presume lager is still the main type of beer you lot drink though.

Cuba - haha, I presume that's a reference to the u.s., are they still not allowed cigars or holidays to Cuba?

Health care - Yes, most non-third world countries have "free" healthcare, paid for by taxes and then allowed equally to everyone for no extra charge, don't they?

Weather conversations - of course! However, I've been lead to believe that lots of nationalities around the globe barely discuss the weather, let alone mention it regularly.

Drinking age - in most countries this is 16 - 18, I struggle to believe it truly is 21 in the u.s., I wonder if it's an in-joke they're playing on the rest of the world, but being so close, I suppose you'd know, unless you're in on it Emotion: wink . For the record, here it's officially 18, but unofficially more like 16. E.g. if a copper "caught" some 16 and 17 year olds drinking and they weren't behaving like raucous yobs, then he'd probably just confiscate their alcohol and tell them not to do it again. Plus, most parents would allow their 16 year olds to drink.

I'm not sure I understand your "potato chips" entry, apart from the "all dressed", which sounds interesting, if a little vomit inducing.

"British spelling" - pfft, there's no such thing. There's only "normal" spelling (someone more critical might say "correct") and U.S. spelling.

Zed - I actually found this site whilst looking for an answer to why USians call the last letter of the alphabet "zee". Anyone have any ideas?

I didn't mention some of the things that were obviously different or irrelevant.

I tried not to go too much into the habit of the u.s. to come up with completely different (and sometimes obscure, strange and less appropriate) words, and especially, names for things, because that's entirely a different story, it's good to see that you haven't been completely taken over (although about 95%) by the USian vernacular.

P.S: I posted this when there were no replies, but it will take a while before it appears because I'm a "Guest". Just in case some people reply before this appears and it looks out of place or contradictory.

Trevor
Hi Trevor,

Interesting that you call a bathroom a washroom, what would you call a room that had a sink (so you could wash), but no bath? Or would that still be a washroom, so there's no distinction for a room with a bath?
> Public restrooms are always labelled "washroom" in Canada. I've never seen a "bathroom" before. It's always called a washroom, never bathroom.

Shreddies here too (don't worry USians, for once, you're not missing out on much).
>Shreddies are good.Emotion: smile

Smarties - I've always wondered why M&M's even existed, considering they are just a crappy version of Smarties, but not significantly cheaper (in fact, they might even cost more). I suppose I should have guessed they were a U.S. thing. Bit of a ripoff though, eh? Apparently, the chap who "invented" them, saw some Spaniards eating something similar during the Spanish Civil War, I wonder if they were Smarties?
> We can get M&M's here in Canada as well. But Smarties are easier to "access." I never knew you couldn't buy Smarties in USA until I read the article I posted above.

Back bacon - Are the only pigs with backs in the entirety of the Americas, in Canada? Can't say I understand why USians refer to it as Canadian bacon. It's from the Canadian part of the pig?.
> I don't eat pork (as a Muslim. But my family is Christian, and my dad has pigs on our farm. Regarding "Canadian Bacon" in the US.... maybe because Canadians "invented" it. LOL.

Bread - confusing. When you say "whole wheat", do you mean "wholemeal"? If so, and you call wholemeal/wheat bread simply "brown", what do you call brown bread that isn't wholemeal/wheat. Here we have white, brown and wholemeal... I think, you're starting to make me wonder now
> Here we have white, brown, and I just looked on a bag of bread and it is labelled "Whole Wheat."

chesterfield
A couch or sofa.
> My grandma calls a couch a chesterfield. I guess it is older language. My family calls it a couch, so that's what I have always called it.

Homogenised milk I'm not too sure about at all. It seems to ring a bell, but I can't ever really remember talking about it and certainly not regularly, so I suppose that means one of three things; 1) All the milk here is homogenised, 2) None of the milk here is homogenised, or 3) It's so unpopular, I've never come across it.
> I don't know "store-milk"... I grew up on a dairy farm, until my dad sold the cows 2 years ago and got chickens. I've seen Homo milk at the store.

Whipping cream here too. Strange the USians go for "heavy" considering it's designed for whipping, plus, once it is whipped, it's light and fluffy. Also, if they just use a light, medium and heavy grading, what do they call clotted cream?
> Never knew whipping cream had another name.

Robertson screwdrivers here too apparently, but I don't know how popular they are. I haven't heard of them before now, but I'm a layman. I think in Canada, everyone has heard of them, right?
> I don't know anything about screwdrivers. Emotion: sad

"Chip trucks" - Slightly strange that you say "truck" rather than "van", but *** strange that you say "chip". I thought your chips/fries/crisps naming conventions had been completely taken over by the u.s. version. For the record, here, chips are chunks of potato approximately an inch thick, by about 1/4 to 1/2 an inch thick, by the length of the potato long, deep fried. Fries (not French, because they're not) are very thin, dry, stiff, crunchy on the outside, powdery on the inside "potato" about 1/4 of an inch square by the length of the potato, that you get with Burger King, McDonalds and KFC (the ones at KFC can be less stiff and dry, more floppy, and less powdery inside unlike the ones at Burger King and McDonalds, although for all I know, that could just be the plebs at my local KFC not "cooking" them "properly"). Crisps are the thin, crisp, flavoured snacks that come in a small plastic bag, or more recently, a cardboard tube (Pringles). They are either made from very thin slices of potato, corn or moulded potato slop (they (Pringles) like to call it "dough").
> We don't call anything crisps. We have chips and fries, but no crisps. Vans are are minivans here. Trucks are transport trucks. Lorries in the UK, I think.

Milk in bags? Sounds enormous fun, not too practical though, perhaps you could elaborate? Also, if you can buy it in jugs, how is it sealed, or is it not sealed because you just mean bought from the farmer down the road?
> Whoa! You don't have milk in bags! That's weird. We put the bag in a milk container. You cut the corner of the bag, and the container has a handle and you pour it!Emotion: smile

Never heard of Molson or Labatt (I'm sure they're local brands), but I'm glad to hear you don't partake of the gant's *** the USians like to call "beer". I thought that could easily be a habit that might cross the border. I presume lager is still the main type of beer you lot drink though.
> I don't drink, but from commercials, Molson and Labatt are quite popular in Canada. Haven't you heard of the I AM CANADIAN rants on the Molson commericals? I'll have to find it online and paste it.

Cuba - haha, I presume that's a reference to the u.s., are they still not allowed cigars or holidays to Cuba?
> Haha. We Canadians can go to Cuba, no questions asked. Lots of people go there for holidays.

Health care - Yes, most non-third world countries have "free" healthcare, paid for by taxes and then allowed equally to everyone for no extra charge, don't they?
> Yes, I think so.

I'm not sure I understand your "potato chips" entry, apart from the "all dressed", which sounds interesting, if a little vomit inducing.
> All Dressed chips are good.Emotion: smile
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
This post was great!! I added a few things below that caught my eye...feel free to correct me if I was wrong.

Anything from the first post I included is marked with "="

anything else is marked as was on last post - my entries are marked >>

Interesting that you call a bathroom a washroom, what would you call a room that had a sink (so you could wash), but no bath? Or would that still be a washroom, so there's no distinction for a room with a bath?
> Public restrooms are always labelled "washroom" in Canada. I've never seen a "bathroom" before. It's always called a washroom, never bathroom.
>>I've heard of a small washroom, consisting of a sink and toilet referred to as a "powder room" also

chesterfield
A couch or sofa.
> My grandma calls a couch a chesterfield. I guess it is older language. My family calls it a couch, so that's what I have always called it.
>> What about "Ottoman", refers to a stool for a chair, that one canadian too?

Health care - Yes, most non-third world countries have "free" healthcare, paid for by taxes and then allowed equally to everyone for no extra charge, don't they?
> Yes, I think so.
>>Except for "the states", where free healthcare would require medical insurance of some sort. I beleive the rest is subsidized, but they still have to pay to even go to the ER

Icing sugar here too. Again, a different name in the u.s. Although the adjective isn't inappropriate, why not icing sugar? Is it used for many other things, too?
>>I like to sprinkle it on French Toast (for those that have never heard of that, it fried bread dipped in egg batter, I'm sure it's known by many names)

=table (verb)
=to bring up for discussion, as in a session of Parliament.

Table here too.
>> I was thinking table meant more to END a discussion, or at the very least postpone, rather than to begin one

Zed - I actually found this site whilst looking for an answer to why USians call the last letter of the alphabet "zee". Anyone have any ideas?
>>I KNOW THIS ONE!!! It's all Sesame Streets fault!!!...lol
Sesame street is a popular kids show in the US, and Canada. Made popular by Big Bird, Oscar the grouch, Grover and Elmo (I'm not sure how many places can actually see this show) They needed the alphabet song to rhyme, and changed the pronounciation for the song. I guess Canadians are just more sticklers for the correct pronounciation...hehehe
On a side note, I've worked in Customer Service for american companies and I've noticed something. An American can tell right away that you are canadian if you say "Zed", and will in most cases, CORRECT YOU!! "It's not 'Zed' it's 'Zee'" Canadians just don't argue about as strenuously as the americans do!!!!!!
Ali al-Kanadaeihomo milk Homogenized milk. Known in the United States as whole milk.

I thought homo milk was milk from homo genus.