Here are two examples where I can't figure out the part of speech.

The man sucked the lemon dry.
I filled the target full of holes.
What part of speech are the words 'dry' and 'full'? My first instinct is to call them adverbs but 'dryly' and 'fully' sound wrong in their places. I can't say they are adjectives because the above sentences don't have the same meaning as 'The man sucked the lemon that was dry' and 'I filled the target that was full of holes.'

O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O Matthew Shelton, alias Xeno, alias Matthias of the Far Woods * E-mail: xeno (Email Removed)
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Thus spake Matthias:
Here are two examples where I can't figure out the part of speech. The man sucked the lemon dry. I ... meaning as 'The man sucked the lemon that was dry' and 'I filled the target that was full of holes.'

They are adverbs functioning in the sentences as object complements. Note that the complement in the last sentence is "full of holes".

Simon R. Hughes
Thus spake Matthias:

Here are two examples where I can't figure out the ... and 'I filled the target that was full of holes.'

They are adverbs functioning in the sentences as object complements. Note that the complement in the last sentence is "full of holes".

Could they or at least "dry" be considered part of the verbs themselves? I am thinking about this by analogy to German, where "to suck dry" could be a single word, like "trockensucken". When the verb is conjugated, the "trocken" part goes to the end of the sentence. I apologize for my inability to express this using the correct terminology.

Mike Nitabach
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Thus spake Matthias:

Here are two examples where I can't figure out the ... and 'I filled the target that was full of holes.'

They are adverbs functioning in the sentences as object complements. Note that the complement in the last sentence is "full of holes".

I am not sure if you would call "dry" an adverb in this case. Could it be a predicative complement of the object?
Thus spake Matthias: They are adverbs functioning in the sentences as object complements. Note that the complement in the last sentence is "full of holes".

I am not sure if you would call "dry" an adverb in this case. Could it bea predicative complement of the object?

Old-fashioned school grammar would say:
The part of speech is adjective, though "full" is itself qualified by "of holes" to produce an adjective phrase. The function of "dry" and "full of holes" is object complement. In "The man sucked the lemon that was dry", "dry" is the subject complement, since it refers to the subject of the clause (the relative pronoun "that"). Briefly, a subject complement tells what the subject is or seems or becomes, an object complement tells what the object becomes, as in "He painted the fence white " or "They elected him President ". A complement may be an adjective or a noun/pronoun.

In "The man sucked the dry lemon", "dry" is simply an adjective qualifying the noun it precedes - probably the most basic use of an adjective.

Alan Jones
Thus spake Matthias: They are adverbs functioning in the sentences as object complements. Note that the complement in the last sentence is "full of holes".

Could they or at least "dry" be considered part of the verbs themselves? I am thinking about this by analogy to German, ... part goes to the end of the sentence. I apologize for my inability to express this using the correct terminology.

I'm not sure, but the word 'adverbial' may be what you have in mind. A famous one in English is "to put up with."

O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O=O Matthew Shelton, alias Xeno, alias Matthias of the Far Woods * E-mail: xeno (Email Removed)
Standard Notice to SPAMMERS: Disclosure of my e-mail address does NOT qualify as consent to send me unsolicited advertisements.
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Thus spake Alan Jones:
is places. filled

I just wanted to write "object complement". You're right, the complements are adjectives.

Simon R. Hughes
Thus spake Michael Nitabach:
Thus spake Matthias: They are adverbs functioning in the sentences as object complements. Note that the complement in the last sentence is "full of holes".

Could they or at least "dry" be considered part of the verbs themselves? I am thinking about this by analogy to German, ... part goes to the end of the sentence. I apologize for my inability to express this using the correct terminology.

See Alan Jones's reply.

Simon R. Hughes
Thus spake Matthias:
Could they or at least "dry" be considered part of the verbs ... for my inability to express this using the correct terminology.

I'm not sure, but the word 'adverbial' may be what you have in mind. A famous one in English is "to put up with."

What he has in mind are phrasal verbs, which is what "put up with" is. The original poster's examples are not examples of phrasal verbs, as Alan Jones showed.

Simon R. Hughes
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