Hi,
I have a question about "can't help but not" phrases. I was talking about someone the other day, and I caught myself saying, "she's so nice that you can't help but not like her." I started wondering about the construction of how I said that as I didn't sound right.

Isn't this improper usage? Seems improper because of the double negative. Wouldn't the proper way to say this would be to simply state, "she's so nice that you can't help but like her"?

searched on google, and looked up this phrase, "cant help but not like" and noticed that quite a A LOT of people seem to use the "can't help but not like" phrase in the same context I did earlier today. I also noticed that some people tend to use the phrase in a negative way, such as, "It was such a lousy movie that you can't help but NOT like it."
Isn't this also incorrect usage as well? If you don't like something, but want to use the "can't help but" phrase in this instance, wouldn't you say something like,
"It was such a lousy movie that you can't help but hate it?"

"she's such a lousy person that you can't help but dislike her?"
Hi, I have a question about "can't help but not" phrases. I was talking about someone the other day, ... not like her." I started wondering about the construction of how I said that as I didn't sound right.

What makes you think this is a stock english phrase? I've never heard anybodt use it.
Isn't this improper usage? Seems improper because of the double negative. Wouldn't the proper way to say this ... movie that you can't help but hate it?" "she's such a lousy person that you can't help but dislike her?"

English is not a set of stock phrases.
Hi, I have a question about "can't help but not" phrases. I was talking about someone the other day, ... proper way to say this would be to simply state, "she's so nice that you can't help but like her"?

I agree with you that there's one negative too many. I recommend staying away from the label "double negative," which is imprecise. If you really want to read up in detail on this sort of thing, you can start with this post at Language Log:
. It will lead you to others.
I finally trained my wife not to say things like "I miss not seeing him." It took quite an effort.
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Hi, I have a question about "can't help but not" phrases. I was talking about someone the other day, ... not like her." I started wondering about the construction of how I said that as I didn't sound right.

It depends on what you meant. If you meant that everyone who meets her likes her, then you wanted "can't help but like," If on the other hand, she's one of those people who are so relentlessy cheerful and perky that they irritate you and eveyone else they meet, you were corect to say 'can't help but not like".
Isn't this improper usage? Seems improper because of the double negative. Wouldn't the proper way to say this ... movie that you can't help but hate it?" "she's such a lousy person that you can't help but dislike her?"

It's not incorrect, no. It's convoluted and a bit difficult to parse out in the course of a conversation, but it's not incorrect.
Hi, I have a question about "can't help but not" ... of how I said that as I didn't sound right.

What makes you think this is a stock english phrase? I've never heard anybodt use it.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=ISO-8859-1&q=%22can%27t+help+but+not%22
Hi, I have a question about "can't help but not" phrases. I was talking about someone the other day, ... proper way to say this would be to simply state, "she's so nice that you can't help but like her"?

If you mean to say what that says, I would say, "Can't help but dislike her." I think people would understand that right away, and not suspect you of being confused.
If you think she is very likeable, I would say "Can't help but like her."
I thhink there are some people who put in an extra negative and I think it is a mistake.
searched on google, and looked up this phrase, "cant help but not like" and noticed that quite a A LOT ... movie that you can't help but hate it?" "she's such a lousy person that you can't help but dislike her?"

Exactly, hate is a strong word, but other than that, those are both better.
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Hi, I have a question about "can't help but not" phrases. I was talking about someone the other day, ... not like her." I started wondering about the construction of how I said that as I didn't sound right.

You're reading it wrong.
It's not "can't help but not"; it's "can't help but" + X, where X can be affirmative, negative, or whatever else it needs to be.