+0
Can I say,

(a) He was careless and made mistakes in exam.

(b) John is very careless because he does / he makes (many) mistakes in his exam.

(c) John is careless so he has / gets many mistakes.

(d) She is careless because she has many mistakes.
1 2
Comments  
He was careless and made many mistakes during the exam (or on his exam).

John is very careless because he makes many mistakes on his exam. (cause and effect backwards...John makes many mistakes on his exam because he is careless) I really can't think of a time when you would say this like this in the present tense. He makes mistakes on his exams or he made mistakes on his exam is the only way I'd say it.

C doesn't make sense.

D She is careless because she makes many mistakes. Well, not really...I'd say you have the cause and effect backwards. She makes many mistakes because she is careless would be more logical.
Vincent TeoCan I say,

(a) He was careless and made mistakes in / on his / the exam. I don't know if in the exam is permitted.

(b) John is very careless because he does / he makes (many) mistakes in / on his exam. One does not do mistakes. One makes mistakes and commits errors.

(c) John is careless so he has / gets many mistakes.

(d) I think she She is must be careless because she has many mistakes. (You have the cart before the horse.)

It should be understood (I hope) that one does not have mistakes until the exam is evaluated and judged to include errors. (Philosophers may argue.) "You have seven mistakes on your exam."

To say that one gets mistakes implies that they are given by someone, which, again, depends upon the exam being evaluated and judged. "She gave me two wrong."

Example (b) has the same error which example (d) has. You've reversed the cause and effect. Example (c) corrects this error by using "so" instead of "because." The mistakes are the result of the carelessness, not the cause of it.

Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Can I say,

(a) The careless boy did some mistakes in his test paper.

(b) He is careless because he makes a lot of mistakes in his test.

(c) She was careless and has many mistakes in the English paper.

(d) She was careless so she made a lot of mistakes in her examination.
Re "in the exam," I believe we would say, "I misunderstood two questions [that were] in the exam." Also, "I made several mistakes on the exam." I suppose the prepositions could be reversed.
AvangiIt should be understood (I hope) that one does not have mistakes until the exam is evaluated and judged to include errors. (Philosophers may argue.) "You have seven mistakes on your exam."
I may have been too hasty on this. I can picture the teacher handing back the exam and saying, "You had seven wrong," which would imply they were wrong before being corrected. (It's still philosophical.)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Vincent TeoCan I say,

(a) The careless boy did some mistakes in his test paper. We don't "do" mistakes; we "make" them.

(b) He is careless because he makes a lot of mistakes in his test. Cause and effect are still reversed. You may conclude he is careless because of the mistakes, but you may be wrong. ( He may have been improperly instructed!) Or, you may say, "He makes a lot of mistakes in his test because he is careless."

(c) She was careless and has many mistakes in the English paper. okay

(d) She was careless so she made a lot of mistakes in her examination. okay We might also say, "She carelessly made a lot of mistakes . . . ." or, "She was careless and made a lot of mistakes . . ."
Avangi
Re "in the exam," I believe we would say, "I misunderstood two questions [that were] in the exam." Also, "I made several mistakes on the exam." I suppose the prepositions could be reversed.

This native (American) English speaker would never use "in" there. I would say that I misunderstood two questions on the exam.
If I'm not mistaken, Avangi also wrote earlier in the thread that 'on' would be the more common choice. I agree with that too.
However, I can imagine 'in' possibly being used occasionally, particularly if the speaker's mindset is something along the lines of "I misunderstood two questions (that were contained) in the exam".
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more