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Can you say "case example" or does it need to be "example case" or are both correct?

I have not found "case example" in the Oxford Dictionary, but I find a lot of hits on the internet. I would rather thrust the Oxford Dictionary though Emotion: smile

Any comments?
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Comments  
Hi,

Both phrases sound awkward to me. Can you show us a complete sentence?

We normally just speak of 'an example', or 'a case as an example'.

Clive
Hi Clive,
Thank you for your reply. I actually mean case studies. This is the word I would use. But I am on a translation job and I see the word "case example", as in "the following case example shows that...."
Best regards, Jochen
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Hi,

case example here is poor English, to the point where I'd call it incorrect.

case study is fine, but it suggests a lengthy and very realistic example.

Clive
Thanks Clive! I agree with you.

Is there someone that disagrees or can we conclude that "case example" should not be used?
Actually a search on Google shows more than 1,000,000 hits for "case example". I have checked some of them (of course, Google is not my reference for English language!) and this made me doubt again, it seems there are a lot of native speakers using this form anyway.

Any further comments please?
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jochenvdkActually a search on Google shows more than 1,000,000 hits for "case example". I have checked some of them (of course, Google is not my reference for English language!) and this made me doubt again, it seems there are a lot of native speakers using this form anyway.Any further comments please?
About half of the Internet search hits seem to be from medicine, where a case is a patient and his illness. That seems to be legitimate use. Many of the rest are coincidental, like "best-case example" and "Select Case example", where "Select Case" is a computer command. The rest seem to be what we are dreading, business jargon at its worst, an illegitimate extension of "case study".

What is the exact context in which you found the term?
The discussion arose during the editing of an article that needs to be written in perfect English language. The article tells about a research project in civil engineering - nothing to do with medicine. We have tested a newly developed calculation tool in a number of different situations. Each of the situations is described in "case studies" in the article.

So the article goes as follows:

Case example 1
In this case example, we are testing the tool under the following conditions: .........
The case example clearly shows that the quality of the end product can significantly be improved.

Case example 2
.....

Case example 3
......
That looks like Newspeak. In that context, I think the reader will not only understand "case example", he will expect nothing more helpfully descriptive. I'm guessing that "Case example 1" is the example that goes with case study number one. If so, I would call it "Example for Case Study 1", but there is a reason I'm typing this instead of earning the big bucks at a think tank communications office.
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