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Hi.
1. I think the word "remain" is intransitive. Is that why no. 2 is impossible, as I think it is?

1.The key is to remain in the door handle.
2.The key is to be remained in the door handle.

2. I think the word "need" is both transitive and intransitive. Which nature does this exhibit? I think an intransitive verb can't be passive. Personally, I think it could be both (since both verb forms can accommodate a continuous verb form).

He was needing an aspirin.
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You can't put an intransitive verb in the passive. Don't open the box until your birthday; the box is not to be opened until your birthday. Here you have a transitive verb put in the passive. But it won't work with an intransitive.
He was needing an aspirin is not passive. It's past continuous. (It's also pretty awkward.)

An aspirin was needed is the passive. (Also pretty awkward.) We couldn't finish the project because a philips head screwdriver was needed, not a flathead.
Hi Anon

Yes, the verb "remain" is intransitive, and I wouldn't ever expect to see it used in the passive voice. Sentence 1 is OK, and sentence 2 is not.

The verb "need" (meaning "must have") is transitive, and you have used it transitively in your sentence (past continuous tense). Your sentence is definitely not passive.
However, the verb "need" is also one of those verbs that tends not to be used in continuous tenses. Your sentence would be much better if it were written in the simple past tense:
- He needed an aspirin.

AnonymousHe was needing an aspirin.
AnonymousPersonally, I think it could be both (since both verb forms can accommodate a continuous verb form).
If you mean to say that you think "He was needing an aspirin" could be a passive sentence, then that idea is wrong. The passive form of any tense must contain the past participle of the verb:

They are building a new school. (present continuous, active)
A new school is being built. (present continuous, passive)
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Anonymous1. I think the word "remain" is intransitive. Is that why no. 2 is impossible, as I think it is?

1.The key is to remain in the door handle.
2.The key is to be remained in the door handle.
Yes. Your analysis is correct.
AnonymousI think the word "need" is both transitive and intransitive
It is listed in the dictionary that way, but 99% of the time it is used as a transitive verb.
AnonymousI think an intransitive verb can't be passive.
True.
AnonymousHe was needing an aspirin.
The verb need is a non-progressive verb. It isn't used in any progressive (=continuous) tense.

Active: He needed an aspirin. Passive: An aspirin was needed.

The passive is not much used in comparison with the active.

CJ
Hi. Can you tell me why there are these example entries for the phrase "to be remained" if the phrase is impossible (since the word "remained" is intransitive) as you seemed to have concurred?


저자: Hanʼguk Singmul Poho Hakhoe, Hanʼguk Singmul Poho Hakhoe - 1964

... in the young larval stage treatments, that is, many of them would die, and
few of selected individuals seemed to be remained in younger stage treatment.
...

AnonymousHi. Can you tell me why there are these example entries for the phrase "to be remained" if the phrase is impossible (since the word "remained" is intransitive) as you seemed to have concurred?


저자: Hanʼguk Singmul Poho Hakhoe, Hanʼguk Singmul Poho Hakhoe - 1964
... in the young larval stage treatments, that is, many of them would die, and
few of selected individuals seemed to be remained in younger stage treatment.
...

I would suggest that it was not written by a native speaker. The "selected individual seem to remain in the younger stage."

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(third person) seems to remain.
Here is an example of "remained" in the passive:
Context:
Alice hid the keys in the box. (Active)
The keys remained hidden in the box (by Alice) for years. (Passive voice)
I don't think so. 'Hidden' appears to me to be an adjective.
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