"Indeed," I said. I don't think I ever said that word before. What is there about an English accent that makes people seem more intelligent than they maybe? And was it catchy?
Does "I " try to say in the last sentence that English is deceptive ?
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"Indeed," I said. I don't think I ever said that word before. What is there about an English accent that ... maybe? And was it catchy? Does "I " try to say in the last sentence that English is deceptive ?

No, "catchy" is usually complimentary, meaning "catching the attention." M-W.com has
1 a : tending to catch the interest or attention b : easily retained in the memory

Best Donna Richoux
"Indeed," I said. I don't think I ever said that word before. What is there about an English accent that makes people seem more intelligent than they maybe?

("maybe" should read "may be".)
And was it catchy?

That sentence seems somewhat odd to me. Maybe it would seem less so in full context. What is the "it" that it refers to? The word "indeed"?
Does "I " try to say in the last sentence that English is deceptive ?

No. Which dictionary are you using?
Adrian
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"Indeed," I said. I don't think I ever said that ... seem more intelligent than they maybe? And was it catchy?

What word did "I" think he or she had never said before? Was it "indeed" or something else? (And please note that "maybe," as used in the sentence, should be written and spoken as two words: "may be.")
Also, I'm confused by the use of "was" in the final sentence. It seems like it ought to be "is."
Does "I " try to say in the last sentence that English is deceptive ?

No, "catchy" is usually complimentary, meaning "catching the attention." M-W.com has 1 a : tending to catch the interest or attention b : easily retained in the memory

I haven't looked it up, but "catchy" can also mean "contageous" in some dialects. (Think "catching.") Perhaps the speaker is asking if the certain something about the accent (that makes people sound more intelligent) is "catchy." (Can I catch it and then sound more intelligent?)
Maria Conlon
A very great part of the mischiefs
that vex this world arises from words. (Edmund Burke)
"Indeed," I said. I don't think I ever said that ... say in the last sentence that English is deceptive ?

No, "catchy" is usually complimentary, meaning "catching the attention." M-W.com has 1 a : tending to catch the interest or attention b : easily retained in the memory

In British English, and I think that's probably what we're reading here, "catchy" is (perhaps rather old-fashioned? I'm not sure) colloquial for "infectious", and is usually applied to diseases. The writer is wondering whether he might get an English accent by association with an English speaker.
In this sort of context, "an English accent" usually means a "BBC" or so-called "standard" accent.
My experience is that in Britain an RP accent gets you trusted in most situations: it works like a charm on policemen when you've committed some minor traffic offence, for example, and gets you taken seriously in shops, hospital accident departments, etc etc. Against natural justice and my political principles, but, hey..!
Mike.
"Indeed," I said. I don't think I ever said that word before. What is there about an English accent that ... maybe? And was it catchy? Does "I " try to say in the last sentence that English is deceptive ?

The speaker is discussing an English accent the type of accent (pronunciation) that an English speaker would use not about the English language itself. However, he is confusing an accent with a dialectal usage, because he is pointing to an item of vocabulary, and that has nothing to do with an "accent," which involves only pronunciation. The speaker is commenting that his use of the word "Indeed." as the reply to a question is not usual for him, and he believes that the reason he used it may be that he picked it up in imitation of a speaker of British English.

The word "maybe" should be two words: "may be."

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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In British English, and I think that's probably what we're reading here, "catchy" is (perhaps rather old-fashioned? I'm not sure) colloquial for "infectious", and is usually applied to diseases.

Hmm? 'Catching', yes, but I've never heard 'catchy' meaning infectious in BrE. (And I'm old enough for old-fashioned to have been positively modish.)

Katy Jennison
spamtrap: remove the first two letters after the @
The American Heritage Concise Dictionary, Third Edition says as follows;
"Indeed," I said. I don't think I ever said that word before. What is there about an English accent that ... maybe? And was it catchy? Does "I " try to say in the last sentence that English is deceptive ?

No; the accent is contagious.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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