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Please tell me, are the following sentences correct?

I will have having my tires changed.

I will not have having my tires changed.

Will you have having your tires changed?

I will have had my tires changed.

I will not have had my tires changed.

Will you have had your tires changed?

Thank you,

Eladio
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Comments  
Just the last three are possible, Eladio. What are you trying to create with the first three?-- I will be having my tires changed?
Yes, it seems that I was trying to construct something like I will be having my tires changed. I just was trying to create a future progressive tense using causative have. My problem is that I have only examples for causative have in Future Simple, but not in Perfect and Continuous. Now, do you understand? Could you give me some examples by using progressive and perfect forms in future? And thank you, Mister Micawber!

Eladio
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Well, we've already done the future progressive causative:

I'll be having/getting my tires punctured tomorrow at the latest.
Will you be having/getting your tires rotated?
I won't be having/getting my tires retreaded.


So remains future perfect:

I'll have had my tires stolen by tomorrow midday, etc-- as you already produced, Eladio. Is there anything else you needed?
Yes, Mister Micawber, your example: I'll have had my tires (and the car) stolen by tomorrow midday is just what will probably happen to me if I continue leaving my car unlocked and parked in front of my mother-in-law house. Emotion: embarrassed

Thank you, there is nothing else!

Eladio
Hello Eladio,

I just loved your sentence, Eladio Emotion: big smile
I'll have had my tires (and the car) stolen by tomorrow midday is just what will probably happen to me if I continue leaving my car unlocked and parked in front of my mother-in-law house.

Mr Micawber,

If we want to make a sentence out of this would we say :

"I'll have (I will be having ?) my tires, and the car, stolen by tomorrow midday if I keep / carry on leaving my car unlocked and parked in front of my mother-in-law house."

But how can I make such a sentence or a similar one with "I will have had my tires stolen..." ?

Thanks Emotion: big smile
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I'll have / I will be having my tires and my car stolen by tomorrow midday if I keep / carry on leaving my car unlocked and parked in front of my mother-in-law's house. -- Yes.

I will have had my tires and my car stolen stolen by tomorrow midday if I keep / carry on leaving my car unlocked and parked in front of my mother-in-law's house.
The first looks directly into the future; the second looks at the relative past in the future.
Dear Mr Micawber,

Would you please send me less curious sentences where these 2 tenses are used so that I can clearly see the nuance?

Tank you in advance,

Hela
Hi everybody,

I'd like to know if there is any difference between the following:

I will have it sent.

I will have sent.

It stands to me that the first one is a type of future causative, namely "I will have it sent by someone", while in the next sentence it might be inferred that I will send it myself.
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