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The sentence:
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Despite the media's tendency to leap from one fashionable cause to the next (from world hunger to AIDS to the environment), it would be narrow-minded to deny their part in increasing environmental awareness.
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What does "cause" mean here? Contextually, I think it's almost the same as "topic" or the like, but I don't find such entry in my dictionary...
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Taka,

Cause used in your sentence is

The interests of a person or group engaged in a struggle: “The cause of America is in great measure the cause of all mankind” (Thomas Paine).

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Hunger is a cause. AIDS is cause. *** Cancer Research is a cause. They are all worthy causes. These are issues where many people have mobilized their efforts to rally support through either volunteer activity or through raising money for research and medication.

Hope that helps.

MountainHiker
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I've checked the American Heritage, and I think this entry of it works better:" a subject under debate or discussion."

IMO, AIDS is not really some sort of movements, is it...?

What do you think?
Taka,

I disagree.

AIDS is a movement. Just ask Bono of U2. What about the huge charity drives to raise money for drugs in Africa, and the lobbying of the US and Canada and other industrialized nations to provide more relief for AIDS sufferers in Africa? Or what about the intense lobbying of pharmaceutical companies. Or what about Bill Gates doing his part to relieve AIDS in India?

I think it is definitely a cause, or a movement.

Hope that helps.

MountainHiker
OK. I understand.

Thank you very much, MountainHiker!!
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