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I have recently asked my three of my English teachers at school and they gave me these answers:

a) I cause a lot of problems to you.

b)I cause a lot of problems for you.

c) Both are acceptable.

Can anyone confirm the answer?
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Comments  
I only use pattern b). to cause problems for someone.

CJ
Along with CJ's comments, it's also possible to say " I caused you a lot of trouble".
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
CalifJimI only use pattern b). to cause problems for someone.

CJ
In that case, if it's an object,

I caused problems (_) the world.

I caused problems ( ) to the authority.

I caused problems ( ) my school.
What would the answers be?
b) is the only correct answer.
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Hi CJ,

I should say, the answer to the 3 sentences is the preposition "to". We use the preposition "to" with verbs or nouns pertaining to time and place.

Ex:

* I will go to the school

* we will retuen to the store.

The preposition "for" is used when we pertain to a person or addressing something to someone. It's like there's an addresee.

Ex:

* I have flowers for you.

I hope this might help.

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michaeltingIn that case, if it's an object,
I caused problems (_) the world.
I caused problems ( ) to the authority.
I caused problems ( ) my school.
I caused problems

for the world.

for the authorities. (I assume you mean law enforcement, i.e., the police.)

for my school.

CJ
Hmm, I know this is off-topic but

I would report it to the authority. = people in charge of a certain place

I would report it to the authorities. = people with legal rights, police, government.....

Is this true?
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