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Does the word Chairman include both genders or is Chairperson the proper term for a female?
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The word "chairwoman" exists now.
I guess "chairperson" is the word you use when you don't know the gender of that person.

I liked the English language much more before "political correctness"! Emotion: smile
Does the word Chairman include both genders or is Chairperson the proper term for a female?


The word Chairman is very flexible.

Chairman both sexes? Yes, though I wouldn't use it. To check this, Google, "Chairman + any popular female name". So "Chairman Susan" yields lots of hits. Chairman Karen yields lots of hits.

Chairperson proper term for a female? Yes, that is one alternative.

"Chair" by itself is commonly used now to represent either gender. That is how I do it. I simply use "Chair".

Try googling "Chair Susan"--lots of hits. Try googling, "Chair John"--lots of hits.

I like Chair because it is brief and doesn't get caught up in the gender stuff.

Hope that helps.
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Hi,
when I read this, I just remember some other words like: Salesperson, salesman, or saleswoman. Why is there the "s" in between but not with "chairman"?
Another example is spokesman or spokeswoman. Btw, why is spoke and not speak?
Thanks.
kynguyen,

anything + woman is hardly used. Chairwoman, saleswoman etc. are not common.

As a check....(Google)

saleswoman - 53,100 hits
salesperson - 1 million hits
salesman - 1.3 million hits

The same thing applies to Chair and others.

Salesperson v. chairperson v. spokesman

I understand your question, but I am unable to give you an answer.
Hello, Kynguyen Emotion: smile

Salesperson, salesman, and saleswoman have an "s", but it is not really something arbitrarily put "in between". Each of those words consist of "sales" + man, woman, person, etc. "Sales" means "of or for selling". So you have:
salesperson: sales representative, and shop assistant.

Chairman and its derivatives don't need an "s" in between because "chair" is often used in singular when it means "office, position or official seat".
"Chairman" is first attested in 1654; "chairwoman" as far back as 1699; and "chairperson" only in 1971, according to an etymological dictionary.

Spokesman and its derivatives (according to the same dictionary):
spokesman: in 1519, it meant "an interpreter"; in 1540 it was used in the sense of "the person who speaks for another or others." Irregular formation from past tense of speak. Spokeswoman is from 1654; spokesperson is from 1972.

I hope it helps. Emotion: smile

Miriam
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Thank you Mariam and all. That's very helpful!
But can we still use the word sales without s ? for example: on sale, a big sale, or for sale...
Thanks
But can we still use the word sales without s ? for example: on sale, a big sale, or for sale...


Yes, all the examples you provided are correct. The root word of "sales" is "sale". Thus,

-A big sale
-On sale
-For sale
-Sale on Saturday

All these forms are okay.

So then why don't we have "saleman" if "sale" is the root word? You can look at Miriam's answer. I simply just accept that is the way it is said in English, and I no longer fuss with it.

Hope that helps.
thanks, Mountainhiker for your contribution.
cheers.
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