The article at
http://my.webmd.com/content/article/99/105116.htm?action=related link mentions some possible medicinal benefits derived from drinking chamomile tea:
For thousands of years, the herbal tea has been heralded as a natural cure for many conditions. The fragrant tea has been used as a sedative to calm nerves and has been touted to have anti-inflammatory properties.
Now new research adds credence to the theory that this herbal tea has medicinal benefits. A study published in the Jan. 26 issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry has found that chamomile tea contains compounds that may help fight infections due to colds and relieve menstrual cramps.
"This is one of a growing number of studies that provide evidence that commonly used natural products really do contain chemicals that may be of medicinal value," study author Elaine Holmes, PhD, a chemist with the Imperial College of London, says in a news release.

For the small study, 14 volunteers drank five cups of tea made from the German chamomile (Matricaria recutita) plant daily for two weeks. Daily urine samples were collected from each participant at the start of the study, during the tea-drinking phase, and then for two weeks after the tea-drinking phase ended.
Drinking chamomile tea resulted in significantly higher levels of two compounds in the urine, hippurate and glycine.
Hippurate, a breakdown product of tea flavonoids, has been linked to antibacterial activity. Researchers say elevated hippurate levels after tea drinking may explain tea's infection-fighting ability.

Glycine is a chemical that relieves muscle spasms and can act as a nerve relaxant. Holmes and colleagues say higher glycine levels may relax the uterus, explaining why the tea appears to relieve menstrual cramps.
Hippurate and glycine levels remained elevated for up to two weeks after the volunteers stopped drinking the tea, suggesting that drinking chamomile tea leads to prolonged medicinal effects.

Oxford Natural Products help fund the study.

Charles Riggs
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The article at

http://my.webmd.com/content/article/99/105116.htm?action=related link
mentions some possible medicinal benefits derived from drinking chamomile tea:

Yes, it's good stuff: along with judicious consumption of Marmite and, for Heaven's sake, hard cheese (I swear by Johann Sebastian Bach and Thomas Tallis this isn't a wind-up) it can help to alleviate depression and anxiety. If I can't sleep I find it's very soothing. But get a separate teapot for it: the left-over aroma plays buggery with ordinary tea.
Mike.
I don't doubt the results of the study.
What I question is the benefits of taking tea bags containing minuscule particles of expired carmomille, besides the beneficial placebo effect, combined with drinking liquid and the feeling that you're doing something good for your health.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I swear, Mike, Brit. English and especially your take on it can send me into giggle fits easier than anything since Laurel and Hardy.

dg (domain=ccwebster)
http://my.webmd.com/content/article/99/105116.htm?action=related link
Yes, it's good stuff: along with judicious consumption of ... teapot for it: the left-over aroma playsbuggery with ordinary tea.

I swear, Mike, Brit. English and especially your take on it can send me into giggle fits easier than anything since Laurel and Hardy.

Ah,well, there we go: we Antipondians have always done it better than the rickets-infested saponiphobes of the decaying mother country. It's the sun, I think.
I am, nonetheless, entirely serious about the vertu of camomile. Not, Arcadian, in the form of sad little supermarket teabags, but the blossoms plucked in full bloom on a perfect July day.

Mike.
The article at http://my.webmd.com/content/article/99/105116.htm?action=related link mentions some possible medicinal benefits derived from drinking chamomile tea:

I don't doubt the results of the study. What I question is the benefits of taking tea bags containing minuscule particles of expired carmomille, besides the beneficial placebo effect, combined with drinking liquid and the feeling that you're doing something good for your health.

Oh, I don't know in my childhood, whenever I had a cold or cough or something, my mother gave me chamomile tea, and look how I turned out!
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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The article at http://my.webmd.com/content/article/99/105116.htm?action=related link mentions some possible medicinal benefits derived from drinking chamomile tea: For thousands of years, the ... drinking the tea, suggesting that drinking chamomile tea leads to prolonged medicinal effects. Oxford Natural Products help fund the study.

Well, they would, wouldn't they? And they really spent big bucks 14 subjects, for six whole weeks! And even at that, all they were able to come up with is that it increases the concentration in the urine of a couple of chemicals that "may" do various things, and are "linked to" various other things.
The irritating thing is that 90% of the readers of the article will store only the association "chamomile good" in their memory banks. Until, of course, the next article proclaims that chamomile causes cancer.
Oh, I don't know in my childhood, whenever I had a cold or cough or something, my mother gave me chamomile tea, and look how I turned out!

I used to get a teaspoon of whiskey with sugar in it. Look how I truned oot.

dg (domain=ccwebster)
Ah,well, there we go: we Antipondians have always done it better than the rickets-infested saponiphobes of the decaying mother country.

Saponiphobes? Us? The home of Crabtree & Evelyn, Woods of Windsor, Yardley's English Lavender, Penhaligon, Pears, and if all else fails good old Boots? Class distinctions, democracy and proper drains? (Oops, got a trifle sidetracked there ...)

Katy Jennison
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