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Hi

Is there such a phrase like "side change"? I know there is "loose change". Do they mean the same?

Also: are these two OK:

a) something none of us want to experience

b) something neither of us wants to experience

thanks
Comments  
"Neither" implies none of two.

"None" may refer to any number of objects >2.
NewguestIs there such a phrase like "side change"? I know there is "loose change".

"Spare change" is what the panhandlers ask for these days in the US.
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Ant_222"Neither" implies none of two.

"None" may refer to any number of objects >2.
Yeah, I know. I remember, however, that after one of them we use "s", i.e., knows, walks.... Neither of them knows/or know? None of them know. Right?
Avangi
NewguestIs there such a phrase like "side change"? I know there is "loose change".

"Spare change" is what the panhandlers ask for these days in the US.

Hi

I know "spare change", and I'm just curious if such a term like "side change" exists and if it means the same as "loose change"?

take care
NewguestI remember, however, that after one of them we use "s", i.e., knows, walks.. Neither of them knows/or know? None of them know.
Right?
Hi,
Here are some references about none/neither, plural/singular verbs.

NEITHER - Usage note according to the American Heritage Dictionary

According to the traditional rule, neither is used only to mean "not one or the other of two." To refer to "none of several," none is preferred: None (not neither) of the three opposition candidates would make a better president than the incumbent. · The traditional rule also holds that neither is grammatically singular: Neither candidate is having an easy time with the press. However, it is often used with a plural verb, especially when followed by of and a plural: Neither of the candidates are really expressing their own views. · As a conjunction neither is properly followed by nor, not or, in formal style: Neither prayers nor curses (not or curses) did any good.

NONE - Usage note according to the American Heritage Dictionary

It is widely asserted that none is equivalent to no one, and hence requires a singular verb and singular pronoun: None of the prisoners was given his soup. It is true that none is etymologically derived from the Old English word ān, "one," but the word has been used as both a singular and a plural noun from Old English onward. The plural usage appears in the King James Bible as well as the works of John Dryden and Edmund Burke and is widespread in the works of respectable writers today. Of course, the singular usage is perfectly acceptable. The choice between a singular or plural verb depends on the desired effect. Both options are acceptable in this sentence: None of the conspirators has (or have) been brought to trial. When none is modified by almost, however, it is difficult to avoid treating the word as a plural: Almost none of the officials were (not was) interviewed by the committee. None can only be plural in its use in sentences such as None but his most loyal supporters believe (not believes) his story.
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Thanks Tanit!
tanx...
Hi,

I'ne never heard the expression 'side change'. Howver, I've heard Americans speak of 'pocket change'.

Clive
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