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Can the phrase 'TO BE CHARGED WITH' have more than one meaning?
For instance, in the following sentences:
a) "He was charged with abuse of power." b) "Charged with promoting and supporting the Republican Party, he found himself being forced to defend a situation which he eventually found to be sickening." (copy+paste) 2. And should the phrase be avoided to express the latter meaning precisely because of its ambiguous sense? For instance, would the second sentence be clear if it were expressed the following way: "He was charged with promoting and supporting the Republican Party, but found himself being forced to defend a situation which he eventually found to be sickening."
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Can the phrase 'TO BE CHARGED WITH' have more than one meaning? Yes
For instance, in the following sentences:
a) "He was charged with abuse of power."The idea here is that he was accused of a crime. b) "Charged with promoting and supporting the Republican Party, he found himself being forced to defend a situation which he eventually found to be sickening." The idea here is that he was given the duty of defending/promoting the Republican party. 2. And should the phrase be avoided to express the latter meaning precisely because of its ambiguous sense? No. The context will usually make the intended meaning clear. For instance, would the second sentence be clear if it were expressed the following way: "He was charged with promoting and supporting the Republican Party, but found himself being forced to defend a situation which he eventually found to be sickening." People know that promoting/defending th Republican party is not a crime.
Note that this meaning of being given a duty is not very common.Clive