In The House Without a Key (1925) by Earl Derr Biggers, there's a quote from a poem which goes something like...
'Angels look down from tum-tum skies on sparkling Waikiki'.

Now, my Concise Oxford Dictionary says 'tum-tum' has something to do with banjoes, but what is a 'tum-tum sky'?
Wiki wiki my litlle malahinis and wahines! :-D
Mahalo
Nick from England
In The House Without a Key (1925) by Earl Derr Biggers, there's a quote from a poem which goes something ... with banjoes, but what is a 'tum-tum sky'? Wiki wiki my litlle malahinis and wahines! :-D Mahalo Nick from England

Aloha nui loha and ey-up chuck right back atcha
"And looking down from tum-tum skies, the angels smile on Waikiki." is what the book says.
Since Mr Quincy is struggling to remember the poem, it may be that 'tum tum' is what we would see more often as, eg, 'dum de dum'. Like

They hand in hand with tum-te-tum and slow,
Through EDEN took thir solitarie way.

John Dean
Oxford
"I come from haunts of coot and hern I make a sudden sally And sparkle something something fern To rumpty tumpty valley."

Now that's what I call poetry! The Assyrian came down Like a dum de dum dum His tum-te-tum gleaming in rumpty tum tum

I prefer something sensible, like:
(Tiddly Pom)
The more it goes
(Tiddly Pom)
The more it goes
(Tiddly Pom)
On snowing.
And nobody knows
(Tiddly Pom)
How cold my toes
(Tiddly Pom)
How cold my toes
(Tiddly Pom)
Are growing.

Ian