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1. When I was a child, I didn't learn swimming.
- I wish I had learnt swimming when I was a child.

2.When we were children, we used to live by the sea in Summer. If the weather had been nice,
we would have gotten up early and gone for a swim.

3. At the time you saw me when I got long hair, did you think who it was?
4. A: What are you eating?
B: Papaya salad, at least it is also one kind of food.

5. How do I have to renew my visa? And how much do I have to pay for the extension? Can
you suggest me?
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Hi,

1. When I was a child, I didn't learn swimming.
- I wish I had learnt swimming when I was a child.


OK. But 'to swim' is more natural than 'swimming' in this context.

2.When we were children, we used to live by the sea in (the) summer. If the weather had been nice,
we would have gotten up early and gone for swims. The plural sounds better, because you are thinking of many occasions in the summer.

3. At the time you saw me when ('and' is better than 'when' here) I had long hair, who did you think who it was?
4. A: What are you eating?
B: Papaya salad, at least it is also one kind of food. I don't know what you mean by this. Say it another way.

5. How do I have to renew my visa? And how much do I have to pay for the renewal? Can
you advise me?


Best wishes, Clive
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Clive
2.When we were children, we used to live by the sea in (the) summer. If the weather had been nice,
we would have gotten up early and gone for swims. The plural sounds better, because you are thinking of many occasions in the summer.
I wonder whether Kittixay actually intended the meaning of the second sentence. Since that sentence basically says that the weather was never nice, and also because the first sentence contains "used to", my first impression was that Kittixay might have been trying to write something like this instead:
When(ever) the weather was nice, we would get up early and go for swims.