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They are in a blue funk due to their country's national eleven going out to Italy in the semi-final. Their hopes of seeing Germany, whom(or who) they have been rooting for throughout the chamionship, in the final have been dashed.

I can not come up with a more suitable version.
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Hello IK

"Blue funk" usually means "a state of extreme fear". Was that what you intended to say?

MrP
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Hello MrPedantic,

be in a (blue) funk
to be very worried or unhappy about something
He's been in a real funk since she left him.

Cambridge International Dictionary of Idioms

I meant they were in a state of deep inner anguish.
Is the rest part of my writing correct?

Thank you.

IK
Hello Inchoate

I find the Cambridge definition very strange. But then, they are very strange in Cambridge (trust me).

My Oxford dictionary meanwhile defines "blue funk" as "cowering fear; a state of panic".

Apart from that, it looks fine – though I would probably use parentheses, rather than commas, i.e.

They are in a blue funk due to their country's national eleven going out to Italy in the semi-final. Their hopes of seeing Germany (who they have been rooting for throughout the championship) in the final have been dashed.

Some people might insist that you add an apostrophe-s to "national eleven" and change "who" to "whom"; but I think that would be inappropriate in a text of this kind.

MrP