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Hi,

Which one of the following sentences is more appropriate?

1. Thanks you. When I meet him next time I will let him know that you were checking up on him.

2. Thanks you. When I meet him next time I will let him know that you were checking in on him.

Thanks,

MG.
Comments  
"Checking up on someone", usually indicates that you want to see if that person is doing what he is supposed to be doing. e.g. I'm going to check up on my son and see if he's finished his homework yet.

",Checking in on someone", means that you want to see if someone is okay. e.g. I'll check in on Mr. Jones today and see if he has enough food for the week.
narrative,

Thanks.
"Checking in on someone", means that you want to see if someone is okay. e.g. I'll check in on Mr. Jones today and see if he has enough food for the week.
I am assuming I can use the term 'checking in on' even if I want to know if a person is financially okay.
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I think your assumption is correct, as long as you are dealing with the individual in person.
Probably we need a bit more context. Financially okay for his OWN well-being? Or financially okay to make payment on his loans, etc?

Even so, usually it would mean physically okay - When the temperature drops, check in on your elderly neighbors to make sure they are warm enough.
GG,

Thanks.
Probably we need a bit more context
One of my friends lost his job a month back. Somebody was inquiring about him.
As such, I was wondering whether 'check up on ' or 'check in on' was appropriate here.
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I would only use "check in on" if you actually checked with that person, himself, directly.

If your friend A lost his job and your friend B asked you about A, then B did not check in on A. He simply asked about him. Another (perhaps regional?) use is "asked after him."

I'll tell Peter you asked after him = I will tell Peter that you wanted to hear whether he was doing okay.
Musicgold it's important to remember that when you receive a reply from this forum that the person could be from such countries as Canada, the UK or USA etc. so you are going to have to evaluate and filter the replies you get as to "English Regionalism". In other words consider where it's coming from and how they express themselves there. For example a person in England might say, "someone was asking after you" where a Canadian or American might say, " somebody was asking about you".
Thanks folks.
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