Could you please tell me the exact meaning of this expression and where it comes from?
"cheers and tigers"
as, for instance, in "with many rousing cheers and tigers for the good work" This expression was used in American English starting ca. 1860
Could you please tell me the exact meaning of this expression and where it comes from? "cheers and tigers" as, for instance, in "with many rousing cheers and tigers for the good work" This expression was used in American English starting ca. 1860

Possibly, but I've never heard of it, so you may have better luck asking in a non-UK group such as alt.usage.english. It sounds as though it may be a purely American idiom,

John Hall
"Whenever people agree with me I always feel I must be wrong." Oscar Wilde
At 18:50:07 on Wed, 25 Oct 2006, John Hall wrote in :
Could you please tell me the exact meaning of this ... This expression was used in American English starting ca. 1860

Possibly, but I've never heard of it, so you may have better luck asking in a non-UK group such as alt.usage.english. It sounds as though it may be a purely American idiom,

I've read it only as an American idiom, and an old-fashioned one at that - the context was, I think, "three cheers and a tiger for (name of team)" and I have the feeling the date in which it was set was 1920ish. I think it must date from the early days of cheer-leaders at either baseball or American football matches. I have no idea what a "tiger" is in this context.
John's right, Herb - ask in an American-focussed group.
Molly Mockford
They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety - Benjamin Franklin (My Reply-To address *is* valid, though may not remain so for ever.)
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I've read it only as an American idiom, and an old-fashioned one at that - the context was, I think, ... deserve neither liberty nor safety - Benjamin Franklin (My Reply-To address *is* valid, though may not remain so for ever.)

Thanks, Molly and John.
I did as you suggested and received this link:
http://tigernet.princeton.edu/~ptoniana/locomotive.asp

Molly, you had the correct hunch!
Herb