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Which one sounds more correct? I should ask, what's their difference? Because I think they are both correct.

1. China market

2. Chinese market

When to use Noun + Noun

of course I know it's not always okay to do that. For example, we won't say China people but Chinese people instead.

Thank you
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Comments  
kenny1999When to use Noun + Noun
Use 'Chinese market'. This is a special case, perhaps, because we also use the word "china" to refer to cups, saucers, and plates, so the "china market" would involve the buying and selling of these objects. I think you are referring to something else entirely, like the Chinese stock market.

Unfortunately for learners, there is no hard and fast rule about when the Noun + Noun pattern should be used or avoided. It is more a matter of determining whether native speakers use a particular pattern regularly or whether they avoid it in preference for another.

CJ
CalifJim kenny1999When to use Noun + NounUse 'Chinese market'. This is a special case, perhaps, because we also use the word "china" to refer to cups, saucers, and plates, so the "china market" would involve the buying and selling of these objects. I think you are referring to something else entirely, like the Chinese stock market.Unfortunately for learners, there is no hard and fast rule about when the Noun + Noun pattern should be used or avoided. It is more a matter of determining whether native speakers use a particular pattern regularly or whether they avoid it in preference for another.CJ
Do you mean that

" China market " refers to a market that involves trading of objects like cups, saucers and plates etc.

while "Chinese market" refers to any market that involves Chinese people?

OK

but how about "China weather" and "Chinese weather"? (When it comes to talking about the weather in China)

I know people won't say "Chinese weather", but why
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kenny1999Do you mean that" China market " refers to a market that involves trading of objects like cups, saucers and plates etc.
I mean that it could. I don't know for certain whether anyone uses that phrase, but the phrase can certainly have that meaning.
kenny1999"Chinese market" refers to any market that involves Chinese people?
I can't speak for allsuch markets, but it certainly applies to the Chinese stock market and (another meaning of "market") a grocery market that specializes in Chinese foods and products. You would not use "China market" for either of these.
kenny1999how about "China weather" and "Chinese weather"
Weather does not belong to any particular country, so you will not have any need for either of these. There is no such thing as "American weather", "French rain", "Japanese wind", or "Swedish snow". These things (rain, wind, snow) are the same everywhere. You'll have to say "the weather in China".

CJ
CalifJim kenny1999Do you mean that" China market " refers to a market that involves trading of objects like cups, saucers and plates etc.I mean that it could. I don't know for certain whether anyone uses that phrase, but the phrase can certainly have that meaning.kenny1999"Chinese market" refers to any market that involves Chinese people?I can't speak for allsuch markets, but it certainly applies to the Chinese stock market and (another meaning of "market") a grocery market that specializes in Chinese foods and products. You would not use "China market" for either of these.kenny1999how about "China weather" and "Chinese weather"Weather does not belong to any particular country, so you will not have any need for either of these. There is no such thing as "American weather", "French rain", "Japanese wind", or "Swedish snow". These things (rain, wind, snow) are the same everywhere. You'll have to say "the weather in China".CJ
OK, I know that an adjective is used to modify / describe a noun.

A weather couldn't be a "Chinese weather" because a weather couldn't look like any country. It doesn't make sense.

But We can say a "Chinese man" because we can determine that he looks like a Chinese or speaks Chinese.

How about "Italy pizza" and "Italian pizza"?

I think there are some people saying " Italy pizza" but some says "Italian pizza"

Can you comment on this?

Thank you.
kenny1999I think there are some people saying " Italy pizza"
That's wrong. We must find them and punish them as soon as possible. Emotion: smile

CJ
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you may use "Chinese market" referring to the market which is considered to involve the Chinese products...
while "China market" is the market named "China", mentioning the name o the market, which doesn't not necessarily involve Chinese products
CalifJim kenny1999I think there are some people saying " Italy pizza"That's wrong. We must find them and punish them as soon as possible. CJ
Punish Google. There are just so many results showing out when you type "Italy Pizza
Along CJ's explanation, I 'd like to add a couple of comments. In the context of trade and world finance, it is possible to hear "China market" in very specific usage, However, I would like to point out the possessive form: " China's rampant inflation " ..." is more likely.
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For the weather question, "China weather" is not possible because "weather" refers to a localized change of natural elements. If you want to make a reference to the climate of certain region in China, I would say this: Northern China's climate is extremely cold during the winter.
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