So my Japanese students are asking me how to describe the colorful spherical balls dangling from the branches of the classroom Christmas tree. Unfortunately I don't have an answer! I'm sure they had a name when I was a kid. Any ideas?

muso
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So my Japanese students are asking me how to describe the colorful spherical balls dangling from the branches of the classroom Christmas tree. Unfortunately I don't have an answer! I'm sure they had a name when I was a kid. Any ideas?

The standard general term is "Christmas tree ornaments", though that includes things besides balls.

Steny '08!
So my Japanese students are asking me how to describe ... had a name when I was a kid. Any ideas?

The standard general term is "Christmas tree ornaments", though that includes things besides balls.

They're "baubles" here, although they're not that often described as such on the actual boxes.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Can I call them "globes"?
The standard general term is "Christmas tree ornaments", though that includes things besides balls.

They're "baubles" here, although they're not that often described as such on the actual boxes.

Baubles? That's the one I was racking my brains for. Now I can spend the week amusing myself listening to my students pronounce them "bouruberuzu" which will sound suspiciously like "ball-bells"...ho-ho-ho...

Many thanks.

muso
}> So my Japanese students are asking me how to describe the colorful spherical }> balls dangling from the branches of the classroom Christmas tree. }> Unfortunately I don't have an answer! I'm sure they had a name when I was }> a kid. Any ideas?
}
} The standard general term is "Christmas tree ornaments", though that } includes things besides balls.
The general term for things you hang by the wire hooks with a hook on the tree end and a loop on the ornament end is "ornaments", but the specific term for the balls is "balls". I don't think that light strings, garlands, tinsel, or the angel or star up top are properly called "ornaments" (but that could be a matter for discussion). They come under the broader category of "tree decorations", which in turn are part of "decorations", which include the wreath on the door and the spray snow and fake candles for the windows.
Standard glass balls have a little cap with a hole in it on the opening, into which goes a piece of spring wire with a loop outside the cap and two fingers extending through the cap into the ball.
The stand isn't a decoration, nor is the sheet that catches the dead needles (or would if the needles weren't plastic). The extension cord isn't a decoration, nor is the foot switch, timer, or Clapper (tm) that allows you to turn the lights on and off without knocking over the tree.

The presents under the tree aren't decorations.

R. J. Valentine
Real ones aren't; fake ones might be.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
}> So my Japanese students are asking me how to describe the colorful spherical }> balls dangling from the branches ... switch, timer, or Clapper (tm) that allows you to turn the lights on and off without knocking over the tree.

Even without all the foorah, you can always tell when Christmas is nearing by the glut of Clapper(tm) and Chia Pet(tm) ads on TV.
dg (domain=ccwebster)
}> So my Japanese students are asking me how to describe the colorful spherical }> balls dangling from the branches ... tree end and a loop on the ornament end is "ornaments", but the specific term for the balls is "balls".

Or, if the BrE are correct, "baubles", though for some reason I think of baubles as referring to other classes of objects.
In SparkE baubles are "bobbles".

Steny '08!
mr.sumo.snr. infrared:
So my Japanese students are asking me how to describe the colorful spherical balls dangling from the branches of the classroom Christmas tree. Unfortunately I don't have an answer! I'm sure they had a name when I was a kid. Any ideas?

I saw some boxes of them in the supermarket yesterday and I thought they were Easter eggs. Is it December already?

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
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