Is there a pondian difference in the use of these terms? For that matter, is there a regional difference in the U.S.? For example, I'm wondering if I say "cilantro" because I've lived most of my life in Southern California, where there's a large Hispanic population. I don't think I've ever called it coriander.

Dena Jo
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Is there a pondian difference in the use of these terms? For that matter, is there a regional difference in ... of my life in Southern California, where there's a large Hispanic population. I don't think I've ever called it coriander.

Cilantro is the leaves (the herb); coriander is the seed (the spice).
Is there a pondian difference in the use of these ... Hispanic population. I don't think I've ever called it coriander.

Cilantro is the leaves (the herb); coriander is the seed (the spice).

So then does everyone calls the leaves cilantro?

Dena Jo
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Cilantro is the leaves (the herb); coriander is the seed (the spice).

So then does everyone calls the leaves cilantro?

Not quite, but "cilantro" seems to out-google "coriander leaf" by about 100 to 1.

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Cilantro is the leaves (the herb); coriander is the seed (the spice).

So then does everyone calls the leaves cilantro?

The herb is called "fresh coriander" in my Indian Regional Cooking cookbook, purchased for, of all prices, a buck two-ninety-eight!

Ya had t'be there, I guess.
I once planted coriander seeds and what should've sprouted but cilantro!

Try Hoegaarden, a Netherlandisher beer of the wheatish persuasion flavored with coriander.
Cilantro is the leaves (the herb); coriander is the seed (the spice).

So then does everyone calls the leaves cilantro?

Everyone? I've gone me whole life with ever the once uttering either "coriander" or "cilantro".
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So then does everyone calls the leaves cilantro?

Everyone? I've gone me whole life with ever the once uttering either "coriander" or "cilantro".

"without"
Is there a pondian difference in the use of these ... Hispanic population. I don't think I've ever called it coriander.

Cilantro is the leaves (the herb); coriander is the seed (the spice).

I think we have evidence of traspondiality on this one.

I love cooking, and frequently use coriander (seeds and leaves), and I have never even heard the term cilantro. Here in England coriander leaves are sold under that name in supermarkets, listed in salads and described as coriander in recipes for thai (and other) food.

Anyone else in the UK back me up? Or have I just been living in an obscure cilantro free bubble on the south coast all these years?

Jell

To email me, take out the takeout.
Cilantro is the leaves (the herb); coriander is the seed (the spice).

I think we have evidence of traspondiality on this one. I love cooking, and frequently use coriander (seeds and leaves), ... Or have I just been living in an obscure cilantro free bubble on the south coast all these years? Jell

Yep, I'll back up that that's UK usage. You can buy fresh coriander, or flavour eastern dishes with coriander seeds; I cook with both.

I've never heard the term cilantro either. Also I occasionally drink Hoegaarden, and I'd no idea it had coriander in it.

DC
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