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Hi,

The following sentence is part of a set of instructions for a coursework:

'The first part should be a short analysis of factors that influence and city-break tourism, with a focus on Paris.'

1. Am I wrong or there's a mistake in it? Can "city-break" be used as a verb? I've looked it up and didn't find in any of my dictionaries, not even in the OED online (I'm subscribed) or in other free online dictionaries. I only found "city break" on google, but as a noun (meaning short holiday in a city, such as a weekend or a day out).

2. Could it be:

a) 'The first part should be a short analysis of factors that influence city-break and tourism, with a focus on Paris.' (were it so, I'd have to analyse both tourism in general and city break in particular).

or

b) 'The first part should be a short analysis of factors that influence city-break tourism, with a focus on Paris.' (were it so, I'd have to analyse city break only).

I'd say b) because of the hyphen.

Please let me know what's your understanding of the sentence.

Thanks in advance!
Comments  
Hi Tanit,

I've never heard the phrase "city break" at all, even as you describe it as a short holiday. But if you have found it to mean "a short holiday" then your rephrasing at 2b sounds really good to me.
"City-break":
I would not use it, as many people wouldn't know what it is. Or would define it in the context.
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Hi,

Thank you both, but there is a misunderstanding. I probably was not clear enough.

The sentence is from an assignment I am supposed to do. One of my professors (who, incidentally, is British) wrote the instructions, so I need to understand what the sentence means, before writing!

Obviously, I could go and ask her, but first I would like to know if there is really a mistake or it's simply me the one who does not understand.

I'll rewrite here the original sentence:

'The first part should be a short analysis of factors that
influence and city-break tourism
, with a focus on Paris.'


My questions are:
- Is it correct?
- If it is correct, what does it mean?
- If it is not correct, would you agree on one of my previous interpretations (the sentences marked as 2a and 2b in my previous post)?

Thank you again.
I don't know, honestly. I've never seen or heard this phrase before. So I would say you would have to go to the instructor and ask what he or she meant, since it's a phrase you've never heard and want to make sure you understand the assignment properly.
OK, it seems to be a commercial name. As such, as would use capitals in describing it.

http://www.citybreakexpo.com/App/homepage.cfm?moduleid=3718&appname=100522
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It's a phrase known to me so I guess it's a British thing. It means a short holiday (usually a weekend) in a major city, for example Paris or London. Normally just taken by a couple rather than a family. If you said you were hoping to go on a city break this year, I'd know what you meant.

The sentence does have a typo in it. It doesn't make sense. However, it is too simplistic just to assume that the and' shouldn't be there. It is possible that another word followed 'and' and has been accidentally deleted.

It must either be ''The first part should be a short analysis of factors that influence city-break tourism, with a focus on Paris.'

or

'The first part should be a short analysis of factors that influence and 'something else' city-break tourism, with a focus on Paris.'

Could be 'influence and create city break tourism' for example.

It's also possible that the missing word is an alternative to city-break , for example 'factors that influence family and city-break tourism'

Check with your tutor. You don't want to miss an aspect of the question.
Thank you, Nona, this is exactly the kind of answer I was looking for. Really helpful!

Thaks also to Barbara and MH.
British travel agents have "city beak" brochures on their shelves.
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