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Why it is incorrect to say, "She does not approve of me buying a flat" ? I was told, the correct usage is "She does not approve of I buying a flat"
I am not a native speaker of English and I've this doubt in mind for years.
I feel this forum is the right place to get an answer for my doubt.

Thanks in advance,
Servlette
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Hi Servlette,

Welcome to English Forums.

You were told wrong. The formally correct sentence is 'She does not approve of my buying a flat'. The rationale is, what is being approved-- the person or the purchase?

She does not approve of me = she does not like me.
She does not approve of my buying = she does not like the fact that I am buying.

However, the form with 'me' is becoming increasingly acceptable. The form with 'I' is definitely unacceptable.
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Hi Micawber,
Thanks for your fast response. By oversight, I typed "I" for "my".
Anyway could you tell me the grammar behind this?

Which one is correct?

A. I don't approve of John buying a flat.

or

B. I don't approve of John's buying a flat.

If possible, please tell me in detail.

Thanks in advance,
Servlette
I am afraid that I just did tell you in detail; it is quite simple:

A. I don't approve of John buying a flat.
B. I don't approve of John's buying a flat.

Which lacks approval, John or the purchase?

I don't approve of John = I don't like John, the person. He is an unattractive, irritating person, whether he's buying something, or just sitting there doing nothing.
I don't approve of John's = I don't like what John has or does.
I don't approve of John's buying = I don't like John's action of purchase.

As I said, this is the formal ruling, and the form which you should use in writing. Practically speaking, native speakers may say either, and the (A ) form is informally acceptable also.
Mr Micawber,
Thank you once again. You've cleared my doubt.
Anyway, if possible, can you suggest me a web page to find out the complete grammar involved for this kind of usage of sentences?

Thanks in advance.

Servlette
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