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Hi,

'Most woman looked at him twice, regardless of whether he was single or not.'

1) What are the words in italics? What is its function? (it isn't an apoositive)

(It is a clause of some sort, but I struggle to identify which type; that is, whether it is an adverb, noun or adjective clause).

2) If it is an adverb clause, what question is it answering. When, how, why, etc?

3) Is there an easy way to identify this clause and similar types?

Thanks.
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It's definitely adverbial, answering the question "how?" (Therein endeth my advice.) - except, "Most women"
O.k.

thanks!

I'm always identifying parts of a sentence as I am curous to know what parts they are.

For instance, this is what you said:

'It's definitly adverbial, answering the question 'how?'

Would you say that the italicised words are a gerund phrase? And is therefore an appositive for the word, adverbial?

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Oh, and on another forum, a person asked to break this confusing sentence down:

'Using my background in being heavily involved in extracurricular activities to devoting time to the community/campus is how I plan to contribute to a institution committed to creating a diverse learning environment.'

I'd like to know if you think what I have said is correct...If that is alright

'Using my background in being heavily involved in extracurricular activities to devoting time to the community/campus = Gerund phrase (noun phrase) with a finite verb 'involved' (past tense)...

is= main verb/ linking verb

how I plan to contribute to a institution committed to creating a diverse learning environment.= Complement/noun clause

It is a horrible sentence. Would you say I have analysed it correctly? noun phrase(subject) linking verb noun phrase (complement)

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Thanks a lot.
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Eddie88 'It's definitly adverbial, answering the question 'how?'

Would you say that the italicised words are a gerund phrase? And is therefore an appositive for the word, adverbial? I'd rather stick needles in my eyes. It makes me ill to say "gerund." I'd be willing to say it's a participial phrase, having an adjectival function.

'Using my background in being heavily involved in extracurricular activities to devoting time to the community/campus is how I plan to contribute to a institution committed to creating a diverse learning environment.'

I'm getting nauseous again. How can you analyze a sentence which is ungrammatical? "Using my hammer to drive the nail is fun." The infinitive is required in this case. What you have here is a bloody preposition. "I'm committed to devoting time to the community." I'm still trying to get my head straight on these. I see this as a participial phrase functioning as object of the preposition. If I say, "I'm committed to corousing," I have no problem calling "corousing" a gerund.

'Using my background in being heavily involved in extracurricular activities to devoting time to the community/campus =
Gerund phrase (noun phrase) with a finite verb 'involved' (past tense)...

Again, I'd like to call it a participial phrase functioning as object of the preposition. I know I'm wrong. "Involved" is an adjectival complement of "to be."

is= main verb/ linking verb Yes! (Gosh, I hope they're not mutually exclusive!)

how I plan to contribute to a institution committed to creating a diverse learning environment.= Complement/noun clause I have no argument with this. (noun clause because it starts with the pronoun "I" ?)

It is a horrible sentence. Would you say I have analysed it correctly? noun phrase(subject) linking verb noun phrase (complement) Not entirely.
'It's definitly adverbial, answering the question how'
Would you say that the italicised words are a gerund phrase? And is therefore an appositive for the word, adverbial? I'd rather stick needles in my eyes. It makes me ill to say "gerund." I'd be willing to say it's a participial phrase, having an adjectival function.

Haha, you really hate the word gerund, ah.

I firmly believe that this is an appositive, and it is therefore, a gerund, but then again, there is little difference between describing 'adverbial and renaming it... Hmm..maybe we need a third opinion, lol.

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'Using my background in being heavily involved in extracurricular activities to devoting time to the community/campus = Gerund phrase (noun phrase) with a finite verb 'involved' (past tense)...

Again, I'd like to call it a participial phrase functioning as object of the preposition. I know I'm wrong. "Involved" is an adjectival complement of "to be."

And you also think that an adjective can be an object of a preposition...
Eddie88And you also think that an adjective can be an object of a preposition...
Never!

As I've tried to suggest, I'm in the process of restructuring. I misunderstood that people were trying to convince me than a noun phrase is so named because it functions as a noun. I was blissfully happy with that. Now they tell me, "No, that isn't what I said at all. A noun phrase is any group of words which begins with a noun - except when it begins with that."

I also have to deal with the alleged ruling that all participial phrases are adjectival.

So what happens when a participial phrase functions as object of the verb or object of the preposition?

Ha! Oh perfidious blastphemy! We change it's name!

I have no problem with the idea that large or small groups of words may serve in the functions of nouns, adjectives, and adverbs. In fact, I rejoice in that notion!

What I find confusing is that the oft-chosen descriptors for these groups of words sometimes slither between the functional and the nominal.

It needs to be clarified that both are necessary - simultaneously! It's a dirty job, but somebody's gotta do it.

- A.
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I think I understand what you mean now.

You are getting confused with this:

'For eighteen years, I was the best at the game'

'For eighteen years'

Nominal=preposition (prep. 'for' as head of phrase)

Functional=adverbial (states when I was he best).

It almost sounds like you understand the way it is, but you are unwilling to ignore the way you think it should be.
Eddie88I firmly believe that this is an appositive, and it is therefore, a gerund, but then again, there is little difference between describing 'adverbial and renaming it
Hi, Eddie, I'm also a learner, and I have never attempted to answer any questions that I'm not entitled or qualified to. But I don't think "appositive" has anthing to do with the first sentence you presented, or does it? anyone. Sorry, I cringed when I saw "appositive" being tied to this sentence, I simply don't see it.
'It's definitly adverbial, answering the question 'how?'

Hi, there, what do you see it as then?

I believe it is either a gerund phrase (appositive in that case), or, like Avangi said, a pariciple phrase describing 'adverbial'.

Why do you not see it as an appositive? It seems to, in a way, rename the noun preceding it 'adverbial'.

But now that I look at it again, I am thinking it may not be after all, haha
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