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I cannot find out the main clause and subordinate clauses of the following sentences.

1) She’s gone back to work at CIA headquarters after her leave of absence, has been photographed by Vanity Fair, and has stood beside her flamboyant husband as he accepted accolades from liberal groups.

2) This has always been a tale in which what is not known is as important as what is and so the spotlight shifts once more to Fitzgerald and what he has learned about the motives behind the outing of Valerie.

Please help.
Comments  
1) has three main clauses:
-She's gone back to work at CIA headquarters after her leave of absence
-[She] has been photographed by Vanity Fair
-[She] has stood beside her flamboyant husband as he accepted accolades from liberal groups.

In the last one, he accepted accolades from liberal groups is a subordinate clause linked to the main clause by the subordinating conjunction as.

2) has two main clauses:
-This has always been a tale in which what is not known is as important as what is
-the spotlight shifts once more to Fitzgerald and what he has learned about the motives behind the outing of Valerie.

In the first, what is not known is as important as what is is a subordinate adjective clause which modifies which.

In the second, what he has learned about the motives behind the outing of Valerie is a subordinate noun clause that is the second object of the preposition to. (Fitzgerald is the first object.)
You say:

1) has three main clauses:
-She's gone back to work at CIA headquarters after her leave of absence
-[She] has been photographed by Vanity Fair
-[She] has stood beside her flamboyant husband as he accepted accolades from liberal groups.

My comment:

Isn't that just one clause hidden under passive and perfect auxiliaries? By your judgement, a sentence like, " I jumped, ran and swam" would have three clauses. But it does not. It is a simple sentence with a compound predicate. Right?
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You're right. It's the same subject, she, applied to three verbs. I goofed.

Do you agree with my analysis of the subordinate clauses?
With respect to the second sentence, I believe your analysis is incomplete. I find one relative (adj) and three noun clauses. Lemme show you my analysis:-

The relative clause: "in which [what is not known = clause subject] is as important"

Noun clause one: " what is not known"

Noun clause two: "what is [known is important]

Noun clause three: "what he has learned about the motives behind the outing of Valarie."