+0
I've recently learned that the future tense should rarely be used in a "when" or other clause indicating the future, but I know that there are exceptions to almost every grammatical rule; therefore, I have a few examples an am wondering if anyone can tell me if these would be correct or incorrect and why. I realize some of these could be stated in a more economical or practical manner, but I'm just speaking technically.

Saturday is when I will fix the faucet. (sounds correct to me)

According to my understanding of the rule this sentence should be -

Saturday is when I fix the faucet.

This sounds like I fix the faucet every Saturday, which doesn't make any sense unless my faucet is very consistently broken.

6:00 is when I will finish my homework. (sounds correct to me)

Again according to me understanding, this should be -

6:00 is when I finish my homework.

This sounds like 6:00 is my regularly scheduled time to do my homework, which could be true, but would completely change the meaning of the sentence.

Any thoughts?
1 2
Comments  
The present simple is normally used for future reference when a timetable or schedule is involved.
Hello MWC

I think the difference here is between the "will" that simply expresses the future, and the "will" that has an element of "intent". Cf.

1. Saturday is when I will fix the faucet.

— i.e. when I intend to fix the faucet: ok.

2. ???When he will arrive, tell him I'm in the bar.

— no sense of intention; change to:

3. When he arrives, tell him I'm in the bar.

(Other members may look at it differently, though.)

MrP
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
I agree, Mr P. For me...

"OK, OK! Don't pester me so. Saturday is when I will fix the faucet/I will fix the faucet on Saturday. Happy now?"

---

"No, I can't meet you on Saturday. Saturday is when I fix the faucet. I promised. It's all arranged."
Thanks, milky, but can you(or anyone) provide more specifics on your comment? Does that make my examples grammatically incorrect? I'm honestly not sure I understand your comment anyway. The present simple is used to state repeated actions or state facts. If I am using a timetable to describe something I did once or will do once, how can I use the simple present?
Hi guys,

I wrote this before I saw the earlier comments, but here it is, anyway.

I've recently learned that the future tense should rarely be used in a "when" or other clause indicating the future, but I know that there are exceptions to almost every grammatical rule; therefore, I have a few examples an am wondering if anyone can tell me if these would be correct or incorrect and why. I realize some of these could be stated in a more economical or practical manner, but I'm just speaking technically.

Saturday is when I will fix the faucet. (sounds correct to me) OK to me. (will' or 'going to')

According to my understanding of the rule this sentence should be -

Saturday is when I fix the faucet.

This sounds like I fix the faucet every Saturday, Yes. But it can also suggest that you have already initiated your plan to fix the faucet. eg you bought some tools. which doesn't make any sense unless my faucet is very consistently broken.

6:00 is when I will finish my homework. (sounds correct to me)

Again according to me understanding, this should be -

6:00 is when I finish my homework.

This sounds like 6:00 is my regularly scheduled time to do my homework, which could be true, but would completely change the meaning of the sentence. Same comments as the first set of examples.

Any thoughts? You need to consider the context in which you would say something like Saturday is when I will fix the faucet. It's not the most common thing to say.

eg Wife: This faucet is still leaking.

Me: Don't worry. I'm going to fix it on Saturday.

My pal, (the next day, at work): Hi Clive, do you want to play golf all day on Saturday?

Me: I'd love to, but I can't. Saturday is when I will (I prefer 'am going to') fix the faucet in my kitchen. I promised my wife.

(This is still not a great context for such a remark, but I hope you get the general idea.)

'When' can, of course, also be followed by 'future' in examples such as these:

When will Tom arrive?

Do you know when Tom will arrive?

Best wishes, Clive
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I've recently learned that the future tense should rarely be used in a "when" or other clause indicating the future

The objection to future tense with when (and other subordinating conjunctions of time) only applies to the case where when introduces a subordinate clause (adverbial clause of time).

It does not apply to indirect question constructions, for example.

So your examples are perfectly fine with the future. There is little doubt that you are not saying when Saturday is (exists) in saying that it is when you will fix the faucet. Compare:

Saturday is when I will fix the faucet.
I am not sure when I will fix the faucet.
*I'll feel relieved when I will fix the faucet.
(This won't do. It's an adverbial when clause.)
*Stay out of the kitchen when I will fix the faucet. (This won't do either - for the same reason.)

CJ
Take a look at this:

All of the following ideas can be expressed using different tenses:


a. Simple prediction
b. Arrangements
c. Plans and intentions
d. Time-tabled events
e. Prediction based on present evidence
f. Willingness
g. An action in progress in the future
h. An action or event that is a matter of routine
i. Obligation
j. An action or event that will take place immediately or very soon
k. Projecting ourselves into the future and looking back at a completed action.
The example sentences below correspond to the ideas above:

a. There will be snow in many areas tomorrow.
b. I'm meeting Jim at the airport.
c. We're going to spend the summer abroad.
d. The plane takes off at 3 a.m.
e. I think it's going to rain!
f. We'll give you a lift to the cinema.
g. This time next week I'll be sun-bathing.
h. You'll be seeing John in the office tomorrow, won't you?
i. You are to travel directly to London.
j. The train is about to leave.
k. A month from now he will have finished all his exams.
Please correct the following;
When i grow up I want to go to France.
When I grow up I will wnt to go to France.
What is the differnce between the two?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more