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A friend has mentioned that I "talk funny". When asked what he meant, he gave me the following examples:

I say, "It needs cleaned." He says, "It needs TO BE cleaned."

He continued to give me examples, but they all dealt with using the "needs to be" before a verb.

I think they are both correct, but they identify different tenses.

Are we both correct??
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Comments  
"It needs cleaned." is characterisitic of a regional dialect of American English.
Standard English places the "to be" after need.
Hi,

Can I take advantage of this thread?

I think in BrE "It needs cleaning" would be a correct alternative to "It needs to be cleaned".
Is it used also in AmE? If it is, is it considered substandard?

Thank you. Emotion: smile
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Tanit Can I take advantage of this thread? No.

I think in BrE "It needs cleaning" would be a correct alternative to "It needs to be cleaned".

Is it used also in AmE? If it is, is it considered substandard? In AmE, it's absolutely idiomatic, common, and neutral with respect to register.Emotion: smile

Avangi
Tanit Can I take advantage of this thread? No.
You're getting pretty fresh in your old age, Avangi. Emotion: stick out tongue
Well, it's not my thread. (But you may take advantage of me.) Emotion: embarrassed
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Avangi
Tanit Can I take advantage of this thread? No.

Hehe, you know I absolutely adore you, don't you? [K]

At first, I thought that the OP might be mixing up "It needs cleaning" and "It needs to be cleaned", thus producing the sentence he asked about. Afterwards, I realised that I only knew about this usage in the UK, where they also use "need" as a semimodal (You only need see her! -- You needn't come. -- You needn't heve brought a present.) and knew nothing at all about the USA. That's why I thought I'd better ask.

Thanks for answering! Emotion: smile
The relation between the BrE usage and the colloquial AmE usage is fascinating.
"You only need see her" is uniquely BrE only in the omission of the infinitive marker, in my opinion. However, your "needn't" examples were quite common to hear growing up in New England.
Of course, living in a land of immigrants, Americans assimilate whatever catches their fancy, and anglophiles are common. Not too long ago, it was all the rage to have a British receptionist answering your phone.
Thanks again, Avangi. Emotion: smile
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