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What are some rules we can apply to use correctly the quantifying phrases "a lot of" and "lots of."

I think you have covered this many times in the past and if you think there are some threads that will answer my question sufficiently, please refer to me those threads.

Is the underlined part right?
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No: please refer me to those threads.

I am terrible at relocating threads, but the answer is simple: there no difference in meaning-- I have a lot of / lots of money / friends -- and they should be avoided in formal English. What else do you need to know?
Thank you, MM.

You said those are to be avoided in formal English; then, what would you use instead of those words?

I have much money/many friends?

Is my use of a semicolon right for the underlined question? If not, how would you rewrite it?
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I would use many, but would try not to use much. This represents a serious gap in English vocabulary to my mind: the awkwardness of much in affirmative statements. When I feel that a lot of is too casual for a written piece, I usually replace it with a considerable amount of.
Believer,

In addition to MM's comments, here are some rules about "a lot of" and "lots of".

(1) Both "a lot of" and "lots of" are used with singular uncountable and plural nouns. Most importantly, they are not used with singular countable nouns.

For example, 'A lot of pencil is on the table' is wrong since 'pencil' is a singular countable noun.

(2) The verb of a sentence is not decided by 'a lot of' or 'lots of', rather the verb is decided by the noun that follows 'of'.

For example,

A lot of pencils are on the table (Subject -Plural countable nouns Verb-are)

A lot of time is spent on Salt Lake River project (Subject -Uncountable noun Verb-is)

(3) Both 'a lot of' and 'lots of' are normally avoided in formal writing. If you want to use 'many' or 'much' instead of 'a lot of' and 'lots of', use 'many' with countable nouns and 'much' with uncountable nouns.
Thank you.

I think there was a post inquiring about the same usage and in it, it had these words.

By Juhumjhum

It should be, either "there is a lot of trees and flowers in the park" or "there are lots of trees and flowers in the park."

Why should the verbs change?
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BelieverThank you.

I think there was a post inquiring about the same usage and in it, it had these words.

By Juhumjhum

It should be, either "there is a lot of trees and flowers in the park" or "there are lots of trees and flowers in the park."

Why should the verbs change?

"There is" + "plural noun" is informal English, and it is often used in conversations.
If you try pronouncing there's and there're, you'll see why the singular occurs so often in conversation, in spite of the rules of concord, Believer.