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Hello, I try to make (cleft sentence)and adjective clause ), but I don't know whether the four sentences are right.
can you help me check them. if you find something wrong, please,tell me how to correct them.
Thank you very much

(cleft sentence) It is deforestation that ruins the whole ecosystem.

(adjective clause ) This is reason why more and more wild animals encounter an edge on extinction.
The reforestation that continues to implement provide a dense forest where all wild animals can inhabit there without any threat.

This luxuriant forest will become an animals habitat in which some of nearly extinct animals will be brought to here and are reintroduced.
Comments  
Hi Wang Chun,

First, let me fix the grammar/structure a little bit:

It is deforestation that ruins the whole ecosystem. (Yes, this is a good cleft sentence)

This is the reason why more and more wild animals encounter the edge of extinction. (I would call this a noun complement, not an adjective clause)

The reforestation that continues to be implemented provides a dense forest which all wild animals can inhabit without any threat. (These adjective clauses are good)

This luxuriant forest will become an animal habitat to which some nearly extinct animals will be brought and reintroduced. (This is a good adjective clause)
Mr. Micawber,

The "why" clause bothered me so much it put me off the question completely.

Would we want to analyze it any differently if it were "... reason for which ..." or if it were " ... reason that ..."? I find this "why" clause particularly puzzling. Any help would be appreciated.

CJ
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hello Mister Micawber thank you for your help.
I have another question.
I am confuse with some adjective sentence.
Can you tell me which sentence is correct. Thank you.

The school creats a environment where students can speak english with native speakers.

The school creats a environment in which students can speak english with native speakers.

This luxuriant forest will become an animal habitat where some wild animals can survive.
Jim, I think it works similarly with 'that', and similarly with 'reason', 'fact', 'supposition', etc, since the reason or fact has no existence without the complement... does it?

'For which'-- that's something else again, isn't it? 'I have a stomachache, the reason for which is that I ate a dozen donuts.' I seem to be in some sort of circular reasoning here. Please help!

Hello Wang Chun,

'The school creates an environment where students can speak English with native speakers.'
'The school creates an environment in which students can speak English with native speakers.'
'This luxuriant forest will become an animal habitat where / in which some wild animals can survive.'

They are all fine, with only a minor difference, I think, in considering the environment a point location in the case of 'where' and an area or space in the case of 'in which'.
Mr. Mic,

I think "reason" works differently - not the same as "fact" or "supposition".

"the fact that I am thirsty" is "fact = 'I am thirsty'", i.e., the 'that' clause is a noun clause in apposition to "the fact".

However, "the reason that I am thirsty" is not "reason = 'I am thirsty'", but "reason for my thirst" in the most natural reading of "reason that". Here "reason = something else not yet mentioned".

"The reason that I am thirsty is that I have not drunk anything all day."

I'm inclined to think of "that I am thirsty" as an adjective clause modifying "reason" rather than as a noun clause in apposition to "the reason". Still, there is a reading of "reason that" which is like "fact that", as follows:

"The reason that I am thirsty is not a good reason for my inattention" is "The reason - which is that I am thirsty - is not a good reason for my inattention".

In the second case I'm inclined to say the 'that' clause is in apposition. (I admit the sentence I constructed may require a somewhat forced reading, as "reason" seems nearly synonymous with 'fact' here.)

The interesting thing is that "the reason why" can substitute in the first type, but not in the second.

I wonder if this is peculiar to "reason". Is this the only noun that can be followed by a "why" clause? Well, I guess "explanation" might work, but what else?

CJ
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Directions say: Identify subordinate clause and tell wither it is an adjective clause, adverb clause or noun clause.

1) Along a racetrack, he set up many cameras whose shutters were controlled by threads stretched across the track.

2) They were the first artists in history to know exactly what a horse really looked like at each point in its stride.

Directions sayIdentify the noun clause and tell how it is used: subject, predicate nominative, direct object, indirect object or object of a perposition.

1) My sister Michelle made another discovery at the bowling alley.

2) Later on, I was pleasantly surprised by the delicious baked beans.

3) Someone should give whoever inveted Boston baked beans an award.

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