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I am searching everywhere for the answer to this but I don't know what parts of speech I'm looking for so I'm not finding what I need.

Which one is it?: "The deliverable must be approved prior to closing out the effort." or "The deliverable must be approved prior to closing the effort out."

Same for: "...check the deliverable in/out" or "...check in/out the deliverable"

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Which one is it?: "The deliverable must be approved prior to closing out the effort." or "The deliverable must be approved prior to closing the effort out." Phrasal verbs like close out are best if the words are not separated, so I'd choose the first version.

More natural than closing out the effort is eg wrapping up the task.


Same for: "...check the deliverable in/out" or "...check in/out the deliverable" I don't know what this means. Please explain.

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The deliverables (90% of the time this word is used in the plural form) must be approved prior to closing out the effort. (effort is very odd here. ... closing out the project / phase of the project / requirements phase of the project )


Once each deliverable is complete, you can check it off the list. (Not check in or check out)

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Comments  

I am assuming the same format would apply to both instances, so I think you answered my question.

The second phrase in my question may have been better stated to ask which of these is correct: “You must check the deliverable in.” Or “You must check in the deliverable.”

What do you mean by 'check in'?

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Ah. Check in would be the equivalent to turning it back in. Someone checks a document out of the system to work on it and checks it back in when they are done.
 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.

Yes, it's the same.

Clive

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