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Hi all

1. Nimbostratus clouds are thick, dark gray clouds .... forebode rain
a. what
b. which
c. what they
d. which they

Nimbostratus clouds are thick --> Noun + verb + adj
But how the sentence after comma ?

2. People who reserve the letters of words ..... to read suffer from dyslexia
a. when trying
b. if they tried
c. when tried
d. if he tries

i tried to analysis, please correct it
- People suffer from dyslexia
- People who reserve the letters of words suffer from dyslexia
- People who reserve the letters of words when trying to read suffer from dyslexia

Ohh i confuce, could anyone explain it to me ?
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Comments  
Hi unix77,

in your second question, I think you mean "reverse" and not "reserve"?
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Hi, Unix,

Let me try for the first part:
Nimbostratus clouds are thick clouds and are dark gray clouds ...
Nimbostratus clouds are thick (clouds and are) dark gray clouds ...
Nimbostratus clouds are thick, dark gray clouds... ... forebode rain.

The verb is "forebode", but you need a subject, a relative pronoun that replace "clouds"
c. and d. won't do, because you'd have 2 subject.
a. won't do either because it's not the form of a subject.

b. on the contrary "which" is a relative pron, can be subject, and is used to replace any object
>

Nimbostratus clouds are thick, dark gray clouds which forebode rain.

Isn't it better to add a comma between clouds & which?
To unix77,

Re: Nimbostratus clouds are thick, dark gray clouds .... forebode rain.

Your above sentence is actually made of two sentences,

i) Nimbostratus clouds are thick clouds WHICH forebode rain.
ii) Nimbostratus clouds are dark gray clouds WHICH forebode rain.

Combining them together, you get:-

"Nimbostratus clouds are thick, dark gray clouds WHICH forebode rain"

Analysing the sentence,

Nimbostratus clouds ------subject
are------main verb
thick, dark gray clouds -----complement of the verb "are"
which forebode rain-----adj. clause qualifying the noun "clouds" (in the complement).
Your solution for the second part is quite OK. None of the others would do.
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To pieanne,

Re: Nimbostratus clouds are thick clouds and are dark gray clouds ...

FYI, your above sentence is in itself composed of TWO sentences,

i) Nimbostratus clouds are thick clouds ...
ii) Nimbostratus clouds are dark gray clouds ...

Combining the two above sentences, we get, "Nimbostratus clouds are thick AND dark gray clouds ...

Because the adjective clause("which forbode rain") qualifies BOTH "thick clouds" and "dark gray clouds", the conjunction "and" is replaced with the comma(",") in the sentence, otherwise the sentence would have to be written as:-

"Nimbostratus clouds are thick clouds which forbode rain AND dark gray clouds which forbode rain."

Care to prove me wrong??
Temico, I can't quite see your point... Of course you can write a sentence that way if you want.
In my explanation above, I had only tried to split the sentence to explain the construction better - I may have failed Emotion: sad -.
I must say that I find the original sentence a bit clumsy...
pieanne,

I don't find anything "clumsy" in the original sentence. Here's another similar example.

"Mr. Brown is a grey-haired old man who likes to take naps on park benches."

This sentence can be split up into two sentences:-

i) Mr. Brown is a grey-haired man who likes to take naps on park benches.
ii) Mr. Brown is an old man who likes to take naps on park benches.
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