+0
I have 1 question and 1 request.

Question:

"Coat check is available on the basement level...." What is the function of "coat check" in this part of the sentence? If you must, here is the address to where I found "coat check" http://www.rialtocenter.org/rent/services/front/coatcheck.html

Request:

I am trying to find the right reference to a place where you drop off your coat for a while and pick it up later. I know these two phrasal verbs aren't 100% accurate, but I don't want to use other words that come to mind which may or may not be more adequate.

Also, using it as an action "I want to check my coat." or "Where do I check my coat?" sounds a bit strange. The response I feel should be something like,"Why do you need to check it? Do you think someone stole something from it? Do you think it might be stained?"

Is there a better verb than "check"?
1 2 3
Comments  
Hello W3.com

It's been long since we talked last. How did you enjoy Xmas holidays?

As for the question, I'd like to believe that you posted it not to kid poor Japanese learners of English like me. As you know, we Japanese use many English-born words in daily conversation without knowing all the meanings of them. "Check" is one of such words. In Japanese, we use "check" mostly as a noun or a verb to mean "examine something to determine accuracy, quality or condition". But as you know well, the verb "check" in English can mean also "hand over something to somebody for temporary safe-keeping". I believe the "check" in the "coat check" is a deverbal noun derived from "check" of this sense.

The full text of the page is as follows:
"Coat check is available on the basement level at a charge of $10.00 per hour (at a 4 hour minimum) for each coat check attendant requested. Renters, however, may provide their own personnel at no cost.
If you are to host some party, you have to prepare a place to keep the coats of your guests and you would need some persons to attend the place. Such a place is called "a coat check" and the persons are called "check coat attendants". I don't think expressions like "You can check your coat at the coat check" or "I went to the coat check to check my coat" are so weird.

paco

[PS]OED says as follows:

[check] 16-c.
To accept or hand over (an article) in return for a check (see check n.1 14b); to send to a destination in this way. orig. and chiefly U.S.
(1846 Daily Even. Traveller (Boston) 16 July 3/2) Passengers will consult their comfort and convenience by being particular to have their Baggage ‘checked’. (1860 Congress. Globe 21 Dec. 177/2) It is a great convenience to the traveling public to be able to check baggage through. (1866 Ibid. 20 July 3972/3) The Baltimore road+will not check baggage from here to any point in the West. They compel you to recheck your baggage. (1888 Amer. Humorist 21 July) Turning to the man who checks umbrellas and canes. (1897 Westm. Gaz. 25 Feb. 10/2 (U.S.)) Remove your hats during the performance. You can check them with the maid. (1922 Publishers' Circular 21 Jan. 43/2) We began to require all persons to check these books at the coat-rooms. (1956 ‘N. Shute’ Beyond Black Stump 4) They walked out into the club and checked their hats.
You may appreciate the reason for this post if you are Japanese. It came from a discussion about "lend" and "borrow". In Japanese, there are two verbs "kasu" and "kariru". So in Japanese, should you ask, "Can I borrow your book?" in a state of receiving, or do you ask, "Can you lend me your book?"

After we talked about this, I brought up the "check" word. In America at least, it is not strange to "check out" books at a library. This means you can use them for a while, but you have to return them. There are magazines which cannot be "checked out".

Instead of repeating definitions of "check" with relation to "coat check", are there ANY OTHER word or set of words you would use? I'll repeat the request, please read carefully:

I am trying to find the right reference to a place where you drop off your coat for a while and pick it up later. I know these two phrasal verbs aren't 100% accurate, but I don't want to use other words that come to mind which may or may not be more adequate.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
"Coat check is available on the basement level at a charge of $10.00 per hour (at a 4 hour minimum) for each coat check attendant requested. Renters, however, may provide their own personnel at no cost."

It means coat-check or coat checking is available as part of deal to rent the facility. You have an option of providing your own person to man the coat-check counter (free) or have the place provide one for you. But if you want the place to provide a person, you have to pay the person $10 per hour and guarantee at least 4 hours of work.

You may have already known the above meaning. I am not sure what you are asking by: what is the function of "coat check?" Coat check is just a service available. Other similar examples could be:
-Janitorial service is available at a charge of $50.
-Bartending is available on the basement level at a charge of $100.
-Disc jockey is available at a charge of $150.

"I want to check my coat." or "Where do I check my coat?" does not sound strange at all.

In America we use these phrases all the time. No one will mistake it as meaning "I would like to check over my coat to make sure there is no damage or stuff taken out of my pocket."

As paco mentions above, there are many meaning to the word check, one of which is (from Cambridge):
check (LEAVE) Show phonetics
verb US
to leave something with someone at a particular place, so that they can take care of it for a short time:
It was hot so we checked our coats before going round the gallery.

If you insist on using another word, you could say something like: Where can I drop off my coat? Alternatively you could say: I'd like to check in my coat, or I'd like to check out my coat.

Hope this helps.

My request still stands:

Instead of repeating definitions of "check" with relation to "coat check", are there ANY OTHER word or set of words you would use? I'll repeat the request, please read carefully:

I am trying to find the right reference to a place where you drop off your coat for a while and pick it up later. I know these two phrasal verbs aren't 100% accurate, but I don't want to use other words that come to mind which may or may not be more adequate.
___

- Janitorial service is available at a charge of $50.

DIFFERENT The post is "coat check", NOT "coat check service". Also, you do not store janitors as you do coats.

- Bartending is available on the basement level at a charge of $100.

DIFFERENT "Bartending is available" actually only brings up 20 results on google. If you "check", you will also see the use is for preparation, not at the moment you go to the building. A coat check in contrast is ALWAYS there.

- Disc jockey is available at a charge of $150.

DIFFERENT Similar to the above, a disc jockey isn't going to stay at the building. A coat check is also NOT a person.
___

Instead of repeating definitions of "check" with relation to "coat check", are there ANY OTHER word or set of words you would use? I'll repeat the request, please read carefully:

I am trying to find the right reference to a place where you drop off your coat for a while and pick it up later. I know these two phrasal verbs aren't 100% accurate, but I don't want to use other words that come to mind which may or may not be more adequate.
Instead of repeating definitions of "check" with relation to "coat check", are there ANY OTHER word or set of words you would use? I'll repeat the request, please read carefully:

I am trying to find the right reference to a place where you drop off your coat for a while and pick it up later. I know these two phrasal verbs aren't 100% accurate, but I don't want to use other words that come to mind which may or may not be more adequate.


Okay, I'm reading carefully, and I'm confused. You ask "are there ANY OTHER word or set of words you would use?" but then you say "I don't want to use other words that come to mind which may or may not be more adequate." Why are you asking for other words if you don't want to use them?

Anyway, no alternatives to "coat check" come to my mind except for "coat room," "closet," and the old-fashioned "cloakroom." None of these are exact alternatives to "coat check" because "coat check" implies the presence of an attendant and the others do not. You could always just ask "where should I leave my coat?"

Admittedly, "I want to check my coat" could be misunderstood as you mentioned above, but usually, in normal circumstances, it would be the most common and ordinary way of indicating that you wanted to leave your coat somewhere safe and pick it up later.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
My request still stands:
That's fine. How about rephrasing your question so other people here who are trying to help you can better understand your request?

Instead of repeating definitions of "check" with relation to "coat check", are there ANY OTHER word or set of words you would use? I'll repeat the request, please read carefully:
The answer is 'no.' The place where you leave your coat for a while to be picked up later is called "coat check."

I am trying to find the right reference to a place where you drop off your coat for a while and pick it up later. I know these two phrasal verbs aren't 100% accurate, but I don't want to use other words that come to mind which may or may not be more adequate.
'Coat check' is a name of a place...in this instance, it's not a phrasal verb. And yes it is 100% accurate. What are some other words that come to your mind?
khoff

"Why are you asking for other words if you don't want to use them?"

I didn't want to influence your feedback by mentioning words I had thought of to answer my own question. It's kind of like having everyone give an answer by writing it on a piece of paper and then later collecting all the pieces of paper to discuss the answers. People are not answering based on other people's answers this way, they are initiating an answer on their own. You have answered without me using some of the terms, so let's look at them.

[ no alternatives to "coat check" come to my mind except for "coat room," "closet," and the old-fashioned "cloakroom." ]

I would agree cloakroom sounds old fashioned, but where does it say this? They use "cloak room" with a space at http://www.courts.state.ny.us/ctapps/counsguide.htm

"A cloak room is located behind the Attorneys’ Library, next to the elevator."

[ "coat check" implies the presence of an attendant ]

Where does it say this?
Danyoo

[ 'Coat check' is a name of a place...in this instance, it's not a phrasal verb. And yes it is 100% accurate.]

When I said phrasal verbs, I was referring to "drop off" and "pick up", not "coat check".
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more