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Hi,

(1) COED - this word really puzzles me...

quote->

coed = a female student in a coeducational institution ( from the online onelook-MW )

<- unquote

Rather an obscure explanation imho... Are there any "NOT coeducational" institutions in the US, UK and other developed countries nowadays?

Maybe 'coed' is used exclusively ironically these days? If you could shed some light on how to use this term (for lack of a better word) SAFELY.

(2) BFF -- is this abbreviation only applicable to females? What if a male calls a girl/woman his BFF? if a male calls another male his BFF? :-)

Please help me with these ("think twice before use it") terms :-)

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1) Are there any "NOT coeducational" institutions in the US, UK and other developed countries nowadays?

Sure, here are some.

https://www.schoolsincanada.com/All-Boys-Schools.cfm

In Britain, it used to be common for boys to go through primary school, secondary school and even higher education without ever being in a class that also had girls! I imagine things have changed now.

2) I've never heard a man use the term BFF.

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vlivefMaybe 'coed' is used exclusively ironically these days?

It is hardly used at all except to recall the days gone by when the word was used as the gender-opposite of 'student'. At least in the U.S. a college student or a university student was always assumed to be male. When colleges and universities opened their door to female students, i.e., became "coeducational", the abbreviated form "coed" came to mean female student, so as to have a way of distinguishing students (males) from coeds (females).

Nowadays almost all professional organizations require 'student' to be used for both males and females and consider the term 'coed' an unacceptable way of referring to a female student. What makes it especially unacceptable is that during the time when many schools were becoming coeducational (after World War II), the persona of the coed was often the butt of "dirty jokes". However, 'coed' is still used to designate an institution that accepts both male and female students.

Institutions of higher education in the U.S. became coeducational over a surprisingly wide range of dates, roughly from 1830 to 1970.

CJ

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Comments  
CliveSure, here are some.https://www.schoolsincanada.com/All-Boys-Schools.cfm

Wow, you seems to have all-girls schools in Canada too :-) Live and learn....

CliveIn Britain, it used to be common for boys to go through primary school, secondary school and even higher education without ever being in a class that also had girls! I imagine things have changed now.

They have.

Clivecoeducational

or coed are not common in the UK. I've only heard Americans use them.

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.

Thanks, everyone, for your input (re: coed)!

Special thanks to CJ for his COMPREHENSIVE comments.

Unfortunately, my first question (re: coed) has for some reason "eclipsed" the second (re: BFF). I am still not sure when you native speakers usually use 'BFF'... Is BFF "perfectly innocent" in all contexts? What do you think an intermediate level student should know about 'BFF', meaning its 'usage scope'?...

Your help with 'BFF" would be appreciated....

I'm sorry to say I can't help you with BFF. That was invented by a much younger generation than mine, so I don't understand it myself (nor use it).

CJ

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