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Shall I know,

"Coins and money" - are they countable nouns?
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Coins are but money isn't.
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See the first response in this thread.
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Vincent TeoShall I know,

"Coins and money" - are they countable nouns?
In grammar, when we say that 'money' is uncountable, we mean that we cannot say, "One money, Two money, etc." But 'coins' is countable. We can say "One cent, two cents, ten cents, fifty cents."
Let me add my 2 cents (sorry I couldn't resist)

Answer same as above. As far as thinking about coun and non-count noun, though two things have helped me when I explain it

often when there are different kinds of things in a group it's a non-count

money works here: coins, bills, gold pieces are all kinds of money. Fruit is the same thing

Now for things like chocolate, soap, etc

We all know that water is not countable, but why is chocolate or Bread. Think of these things in their original state: bread was a big mound of dough that you couldn't count the loaves of bread in. Chocolate--before we make it in a candy bar is a big melted pot of hot chocolate...we can't count how many candies there are in that...
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Vincent TeoShall I know, "Coins and money" - are they countable nouns?
Shall I know coin is a countable or uncountable noun
 fivejedjon's reply was promoted to an answer.