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If there is more than one consumer, we should say,

consumers' attentions

right?

Even though I see it written singularly in published work.

Is there an exception to the rule perhaps? If you think of the consumers as having a collection attention--as being a collective noun?

Thanks
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I think "attention" is uncountable.

"Collective noun" seems to be the wrong term here.

Suppose it were "admiration"? (uncountable)

The quarterback had the fans' admirations. No way!

(Each fan has an admiration for him, so there must be many admirations. Interesting question.)

But how do you explain it?? How many admirations were there?
To me, it has to be written plurally (never thought I'd have to use this word), unless the thing being possessed is seen a collective thing... Are we going nowhere?
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Can you think of a few more examples of what you're talking about?

In a way, I think this relates to a discussion I was having with dimsum, which also ended up in a stalemate.

http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/ElectricalResistances/xnqkm/post.htm

I checked the pressure(s) in my tires. (I checked my tires' pressures.) No.

I recorded the height(s) of all the students in the room. (I recorded all the students' heights.) Yes.

In my second example, each height is understood to be unique.

Kind regards, - A.
Thanks for the link. That discussion goes slightly wayward, with terminology getting the better of you guys Emotion: smile

I always wondered if there were rules around this sort of thing. Surely there is? Maybe we have to just apply a bit of common sense (whatever the hell that is).

I'm just glad you didn't respond to this thread saying something like 'why not avoid the phrasing altogether and say ...'. Emotion: super angry That frustrates me to my very core. If we bypassed every predicament, we would get nowhere.

Cheers
English 1b3with terminology getting the better of you guys
Hey- - Hey- - Hey! Emotion: smirking
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I meant not to insult your intelligence nor your electrical skills. I'm sure you are very capable. Me, I struggle to change a light bulb.
No worries. I was just kidding.

One of my friends used to use that line with mock anger. I can hear his voice but I can't see his face. Who the heck was that guy?Emotion: thinking
English 1b3I meant not to insult your intelligence
I answered a post on that word order yesterday, and said it was fine. Took all kinds of flack on it.
The poster wanted refs, and I couldn't find one decent article via Google on the placement of "not."
Either a feast or a famine!

Best wishes, - A.
I answered a post on that word order yesterday, and said it was fine. Took all kinds of flack on it.

The poster wanted refs, and I couldn't find one decent article via Google on the placement of "not."

Either a feast or a famine!

Instead of between the particle to and the base form of the verb?

I definitely agree with you.
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